Friday, May 2, 2014

Cybermagazine - Thursday

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Radio Canada International - Cybermagazine

Thursday May 1 2014 edition 

HIGHLIGHTS

Auction house withdraws bloodied aboriginal tunic

Complaints on social media prompted Waddington’s to pull from auction a small aboriginal child’s leather tunic with a bullet hole and dried blood in the chest area. The gruesome artifact was part of a collection belonging to the late William Jamieson, a world-renowned dealer of tribal art and collector of macabre items, including electric chairs and shrunken heads. Some ...

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Labour leader Sid Ryan calls for worker mobilization, militancy

"The Cdn Labour Movement is at a crossroads. We need to build resistance to Harper from coast to coast. We need a change in direction," wrote Sid Ryan, president of the Ontario Federation of Labour (OFL), in a comment on Twitter on Wednesday (April 30).

Representing more than a million unionized workers in Canada's most populous province of ...

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Manitoba versus the zebra mussel

They are small, but cause huge problems. Invasive zebra mussels have already caused major environmental change and a costly problem in lakes and rivers throughout eastern Canada and much of the US.

Last year they were discovered in Lake Winnipeg, and now the western province of Manitoba is going to try to eliminate them from four harbours in an experimental ...

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CANADIAN HEADLINES

New budget in province of Ontario could set off election

“This Budget looks not only at the days ahead but at the next decade," said the province of Ontario's Finance Minister Charles Sousa. "We are laying out a robust plan for a strong Ontario with more jobs, more opportunity and more security for now and into the future."

Tabled Thursday (May 1) in the legislature of Canada's second most ...

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OECD: Top 1% of Canadians account for 37% of total income growth

The reason general income growth is not seen by most people in their salaries is because the top richest 1% get most of it. In Canada, 37% and in the United States, 47%, according to a new study released Wednesday (April 30) by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD).

"The majority of the population cannot reconcile the aggregate income ...

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Old ideas, new again: human waste as fertilizer.

It is perhaps the ultimate example of recycling, although some wags are calling it “pee-cycling”.  It’s the ancient practice of using human waste to fertilize crops.

"a positive experience"

One farmer in east-coast Nova Scotia, says he’s been spreading biosolids on his fields for about six years.  Jack Folkertsma says, “"It's been a positive experience for ...

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Experts concerned about effects of fracking

There is little information about the effects on the environment of hydraulic fracturing to extract natural gas, according to a panel of 14 international experts. Canada’s environment minister commissioned a report from the Council of Canadian Academies in response to growing protests about so-called fracking.

In this process, energy companies inject chemicals and sand ...

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Lawyers’ self-policing needs reform,’ critic says

The long time it took for a lawyers’ association to investigate a complaint and disbar one of its members illustrates the need to change the way the profession is regulated, says a former law school dean.

In Canada, each province has its own professional association of lawyers who regulate, license and discipline their own members.

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Getting ready for the Royals in Nova Scotia

Volunteers are working hard to restore an old sailing ship in time for a visit by the Prince of Wales and Duchess of Cornwall to Pictou, Nova Scotia this month.


The replica Hector was launched in 2000 as part of heritage centre ...

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IN DEPTH

 



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