Thursday, December 5, 2013

Cybermagazine - Thursday

Display problems? View this newsletter in your browser.

Thursday December 5 2013 edition

HIGHLIGHTS

Protests, concern with Canada's proposed First Nation Education Act

A proposed new law dealing with First Nation Indigenous education in Canada is meeting with resistance across Canada from Indigenous communities.

In Canada's largest city of Toronto, the Association of Iroquois and Allied Indians (AIAI) held a protest rally against the First Nation Education Act on Wednesday (December 4)

The proposed act was made public by the ...

Read more...

Trade rules colliding with climate change policies

A new study suggests international trade deals hinder progress on climate change.

The study by authors Dan and Natiassia Ciuriak was released in conjunction with the University of Calgary’s School of Public Policy.

The report is called “Climate Change and the Trading System: After Doha and Doha”

Dan Ciuriak is Director and Principle of Ciuriak Consulting, and ...

Read more...

Astronaut’s arteries may reveal clues on ageing

Canadian astronaut Chris Hadfield’s arteries stiffened while he was in space and studying him may reveal information on what happens to people’s arteries as they age here on earth.  Researchers at the University of Waterloo in Ontario are looking for a marker in the blood that might help them understanding a process that can be so damaging to ...

Read more...

CANADIAN HEADLINES

Open letter to Canada's Foreign Minister, MPs about gold mine in Romania

Several high profile environmental and citizen groups have joined activists in Canada and Romania in an open letter to Canada's Foreign Affairs Minister John Baird and Members of Parliament to withdraw government support for a gold mine in Romania.

The letter also calls on Canadian parliamentarians to enact legislation making Canadian corporations more accountable for their operations abroad.
...

Read more...

Dwindling salmon:"Get tough with the Americans" says Yukon aboriginal chief

They are called “King” salmon, the wild Chinook salmon in Alaska and the Yukon are among the most desirable catch of all salmon. They live in the Pacific Ocean but return to spawn in the fresh water rivers and streams where they were born.

To get to the Yukon they must swim up the Yukon River about 3,000 km ...

Read more...

42nd annual Nova Scotia Christmas tree gift to Boston

For the 42nd year in a row, a Christmas tree from the Canadian province of Nova Scotia will be part of a special lighting ceremony in the U.S. city of Boston on Thursday (December 5).

The 15 metre white spruce is about 40 years old and will be the 42nd tree sent to Boston since the tradition began in ...

Read more...

Big bank, big profit, job cuts

The Bank of Montreal (BMO) cut 997 full time jobs in the last quarter of the 2013 fiscal year in which it earned a record profit of $4.2 billion. While the news may annoy the average Canadian, analysts say it is a predictable consequence of improved productivity and a stagnant economy.

BMO offers personal and commercial banking in the ...

Read more...

Retired teacher files “ageism” lawsuit against New Brunswick school board

A retired school teacher has filed a complaint with the Human Rights Commission in the east coast province of New Brunswick.

A school district policy prevents retired teachers from being hired as “supply or substitute” teachers, ie temporary fill-in replacements for regular teachers.

Fred Hall, 67, says the policy amounts to age discrimination.  Mr Hall, from Nova Scotia, ...

Read more...

Famous snow village tourist attraction threatened

Montreal’s ice hotel, ice bar, ice chapel and restaurant cannot afford to open this year and organizers are asking for government help so they can re-open next winter. The award-winning snow village was featured by CNN travel in January as one of the best frozen getaways in the world.

Read more...

IN DEPTH

 



Radio Canada International
1400, boulevard René-Lévesque Est
Montréal (Québec)
Canada
H2L 2M2