Thursday, October 17, 2013

Cybermagazine - Thursday

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Thursday October 17 2013 edition

HIGHLIGHTS

Canadian parliament opens with a Throne Speech

Canada's Parliament began a new session with yesterday's Speech from the Throne.  The Governor General, as the Queen's representative in Canada, delivers the speech that outlines the government's priorities and plans for the future.

The current Conservative government of Stephen Harper has two years left in their mandate, and this speech is ...

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Assessing Pan-Arctic Biodiversity for policy planners

In terms of flora and fauna, in order to know what to protect or how to protect it, one must first know what’s there, and where it is.

To that end in the circumpolar region, an Arctic Biodiversity Assessment has been undertaken.

Donald Reid (PhD) is a conservation zoologist in Whitehorse, Yukon, with Wildlife Conservation Society ...

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Gene linked to negative outlook

A genetic variation can significantly affect how people see and experience the world, according to a new study from the University of British Columbia (UBC) in western Canada. Participants who had the variation ADRA2b were more likely to notice negative words when shown a rapid succession of positive, negative and neutral words.

Some people “more tuned ...

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CANADIAN HEADLINES

NAC Orchestra touring China

The National Arts Centre Orchestra is on its first tour of China in the largest cultural exchange between the two countries.

The Ottawa-based orchestra began the tour on October 4th and has performed in seven Chinese cities, including Hong Kong, Guangzhou, and tonight, in Beijing. This weekend the group plays Shanghai, and the tour wraps up on ...

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Norway returns Amundsen's tools for opening of Nattilik Heritage Centre

The Nattilik Heritage Centre in Gjoa Haven, Nunavut is celebrating its opening today.  It's also celebrating the return of some traditional tools and objects from Norway.

A handmade harpoon, snow googles and snow knives, as well as a traditional oil lamp were among the artefacts brought by archeologist Tom Svensson from Norway's Museum ...

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Shot Moose could be a record size

A huge bull moose shot last month by a hunter in Canada’s northern territory of Yukon could be the largest one ever harvested. Heinz Naef says he didn’t at first realize how big the animal was.

"It didn't set in until we were in the midst of butchering the animal," Naef says. "It's not the first big moose we have ...

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Common cycling accident caught on video

At a time when Canadian officials are promoting more physical activity including cycling, the most common kind of cycling accident was caught on video in Montreal. Marie Jacobs says she was lucky to escape with only minor injuries after someone opened their car door into the bike path and she was unable to stop.

The accident was ...

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Toronto's elephants to leave for California sanctuary today

The long saga over the health, and welfare elephants at Toronto Zoo is nearing its conclusion today.

The three remaining and aging elephants will be loaded into giant cages today, and trucked to a sanctuary in California

Elephants first came to the zoo in Canada’s biggest city in 1974, when three young animals arrived from Africa. ...

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Oct 17: Anniversary of a terrorist assassination in Canada

Canada is, and perceived to be, a very peaceful place to live, but for a period in the 1960’s to 1970, it was a scary place in the mostly Francophone province of Quebec, and especially in the biggest city, Montreal.

During that time a radical marxist Francophone group agitating for the separation of Quebec from Canada, began a series ...

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IN DEPTH

 



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