Thursday, October 10, 2013

Cybermagazine - Thursday

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Thursday October 10 2013 edition

HIGHLIGHTS

Alice Munro: Hope this makes people see the short story as an important art

"It is so surprising, and so wonderful," Alice Munro told the first reporter who called her after she had been woken with the news she had won the Nobel Prize in Literature on Thursday (October 10).

And the surprise was still there as the 82 year old author talked to other journalists through the day about being the ...

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Hudson Bay lowlands succumbing to warming, climate change

It’s one of the last unchanged Arctic refugia in the world. Or, it was.

The vast area around Hudson Bay, had been a holdout against climate change until a little over a decade ago.

John Smol has been studying arctic climate issues for 30 years. He is a professor of Biology at Queen’s University, in Kingston, Ontario  He ...

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Some restaurants will have to list calories

Calorie counts and other nutritional information will soon have to be on the menus of large chain restaurants in the province of Ontario. The government plans to make it the law this winter in a bid to counter the growing obesity problem in the province. The hope is that once they are provided with the information, patrons ...

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CANADIAN HEADLINES

Montreal's 'Festival du nouveau cinéma' expanding horizons

Started by two film fans, the Festival du nouveau cinéma (Festival of new cinema) is now in its 42nd year. This year’s edition features 273 films from 47 countries.

The focus has always been to expand horizons, and show all kinds of films, particularly independent cinema and films lacking distribution or corporate sponsorship.

Even so, the Montreal festival ...

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Canada signs "Minimata" mercury treaty

Canada today signed the international agreement known as the Minamata Convention on mercury pollution.

This is a global effort to reduce mercury emissions and releases into the environment.

While Canada has reduced its own level of mercury emmissions by some 90% in the past few decades, the fact is that 95% of mercury from human activity deposited in ...

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Supreme Court hearing Ottawa man's challenge of security certificates

An Ottawa man accused of terrorist ties for more than a decade was before the Supreme Court of Canada Thursday (October 10) to challenge the constitutionality of national security certificates.

Almost 11 years after his arrest, Mohamed Harkat, a former gas station attendant and pizza delivery man "is still unaware of the substance of these very serious allegations," says the filing ...

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Improper blood tests at University of Regina put hundreds at risk

The University of Regina, in the prairie province of Saskatchewan  admits it made some mistakes.


The tests involved reusable equipment. Although needles were changed, the small needle holder section shown separated from larger tester, was merely swabbed with alcohol and ...

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Cell phone service fails millions

One wonders how millions of Canadian managed without the use of their Rogers, Fido and Chartr mobile phone services Wednesday night. Younger Canadians seemed to be addicted to their phones, and people are increasingly cancelling their home landlines and depending on cell phones instead.

Service was restored late Wednesday night and the chief executive of Rogers Communications apologized to ...

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Canadian author Alice Munro wins Nobel Prize

Canadians were delighted to wake up to the news today that beloved short story writer Alice Munro had won the Nobel Prize for literature.  She is the first Canadian-based author to do so and said she was delighted and “just terribly surprised” at the honour.

Striking portraits of women living in small towns in the province of ...

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IN DEPTH

 



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