Monday, May 20, 2013

Cybermagazine - Monday

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Monday May 20 2013 edition

HIGHLIGHTS

Massive waterfowl census underway in North America

In what’s considered to be the world’s largest wildlife survey, people are fanning out across huge swaths of North America to count different species of waterfowl and ponds. The surveys have been done every year since 1955 by the Canadian and U.S. wildlife services, state and provincial governments, aboriginal groups and special-interest organizations like

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Is it time to break up the Jays?

Victoria Day (la fete des patriotes in Quebec) is traditionally the time when baseball fans in Canada assess the state of the Major League Baseball season and the hopes of Canada's only Major League team, the Toronto Blue Jays.

About a quarter of the season has been played, and fans across the country--who began the season two months ago ...

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Flu risks more paralytic disease than flu shot

There is a small risk of getting a paralytic illness after getting the flu shot, but that risk is higher if you actually get the flu according to a new study. Most Canadians can get a vaccination against the current strain of influenza each year. But some are afraid to because of the risk of developing Guillain-Barré syndrome or ...

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CANADIAN HEADLINES

Poisonous algae a growing problem

Blue-green algae is a growing problem in the lakes of the eastern province of New Brunswick, according to Eastern Charlotte Waterways. This organization is dedicated to protecting lakes in the province. Researcher Donald Killorn says the algae blooms are a sign climate change is affecting ecology in eastern Canada.

The algae forms in water that is shallow, ...

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Does Victoria Day need a new name?

Canadians celebrated a holiday on Monday.

For English Canadians, the day off work was in honour of Queen Victoria, the long-reigning monarch of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, who ruled from June 1837 to January 1901 and oversaw the creating of the Federation of Upper Canada (Ontario) and Lower Canada (Quebec, New Brunswick and Prince Edward ...

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Neil Reynolds dies at 72

A legendary Canadian newspaperman died over the weekend.

Neil Reynolds, a high-school dropout who rose to become city editor and assistant managing editor of the Toronto Star in the 1970s and later served as an editor and publisher at newspapers across the country, passed away from cancer in Ottawa on Sunday. He was 72.

Mr. Reynolds was beloved ...

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Freak snowstorm hammers Newfoundland on “planting weekend”

Heavy snowfall is not at all what you expect on this holiday weekend in Canada. After a seemingly interminable winter, Canadians usually revel in the May long weekend gardening, dusting off the barbecue, having a beer on the deck and, if they are lucky enough to have one, opening up their summer cottages.

Instead Newfoundlanders in the eastern Canadian city ...

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Prime minister’s aid resigns amid Senate scandal

The prime minister’s chief of staff, Nigel Wright, has resigned over action he took in an expense scandal in the Canadian Senate. Wright wrote a check for $90,000 to pay Senator Mike Duffy’s improperly claimed housing expenses.

Senators are allowed to claim a housing allowance if their primary residence is 100 km away from the nation’s capital, Ottawa. Duffy ...

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Stan Douglas honoured with Scotiabank Photography Award

Stan Douglas won the Scotiabank Photography Award.  The $50,000 prize is given each year to a contemporary Canadian photographer.

Douglas will also have a collection of his work published internationally by German art publisher Steidl, and a solo exhibition at the CONTACT Photography Festival in Toronto in 2014.

Based in Vancouver, Douglas has captured major events in British ...

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IN DEPTH

 



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