Wednesday, December 28, 2011

RCI Cyberjournal

Edition 27 December 2011
Canadian International
Canadian

 

Family of missing Canadian identify his body in Hong Kong


 

The sister of a Canadian man reported missing in Hong Kong says he has been found dead. Cindy Basha says family members have identified the body of Joseph Basha from Newfoundland and Labrador. The 25-year-old student disappeared December 21st after going out to pick up a take-out order. Police say that same day they discovered the body of a foreigner with no identifying documents on him. Basha moved to Hong Kong in 2008 to study international and public affairs. He was also the lead singer in a band. Police in Hong Kong expect to make a formal identification of the body on Wednesday.

The sister of a Canadian man reported missing in Hong Kong says he has been found dead. Cindy Basha says family members have identified the body of Joseph Basha from Newfoundland and Labrador.

The 25-year-old student disappeared December 21st after leaving his apartment to pick up a take-out meal. Police say that same day they discovered the body of a foreigner with no identifying documents on him. Basha moved to Hong Kong in 2008 to study international and public affairs.

He was also the lead singer in a band. Police in Hong Kong expect to make a formal identification of the body on Wednesday.

 

 

 



Former Canadian Prime Minister devotes time to aboriginals


Former Canadian Prime Minister, Paul Martin, is devoting his time and personal fortune to making life better for Canada's aboriginals.

He calls his invovlement a moral issue because the country has discriminated against aboriginals since the beginning of the first settlement.

He also says it's difficult for him to talk about Canadian values when he travels abroad especially since those same values are not used in Canada.

As Prime Minister, Martin made aboriginal issues a personal priority.

Martin and his Liberal Party were defeated by the Conservative Party in the 2005 federal election.



Canada's interim NDP leader has a tough  time


The interim leader of Canada's official opposition New Democratic Party admits she has made mistakes that have led to the declining popularity of the NDP in the Province of Quebec.

Nycole Turmel says that it has been a major challenge to lead the party since she replaced Jack Layton who died of cancer in August.

The party had just won its most seats ever in the May election under Layton's leadership. And a majority of those seats came from the Province of Quebec at the expense of the separatist Bloc Quebecois party.

The 69-year old Turmel has been criticized for not being able to attack the governing Conservative Party over its recent passage of what some have called controversial bills.



Bright outlook for Canada's economy


A leading Canadian economist is predicting that Canada and the United States will both see economic growth in 2012.

Douglas Porter, deputy chief economist with BMO capital markets, says this growth will come despite a recession in Europe.

He says the economies of Canada and the U.S. will grow by about two per cent next year.

In addition, he says the most encouraging development in recent months, is the ability of the U.S. economy to have modest momentum in the face of Europe's financial crisis.

And Porter says that this year, Canada had economic growth that was stronger than other regions including the U.S., Europe and the so called emerging market of Brazil.





International

Arab League 's observer mission says all sides responsive to the monitors


The head of the Arab League's observer mission in Syria says the first day in Homs was very good. Sudanese general Mustafa Dabi says all sides were responsive to the monitors. Syrian activists claim government tanks were withdrawn from the city before the monitors arrived.

Several dozen people were killed there in the past several days.

Today at least 70,000 protestors marched to the centre of Homs, which has been a flashpoint in the violence that's taken over 5,000 lives since the revolt against President Bashar al Assad's regime began in March. One report says the protestors told the Arab League observers that they want international protection.



Iran warns it could block key oil route if sanctions imposed


Iran is warning Western countries not to impose sanctions on its oil exports. First vice president Mohammad Reza Rahimi says if that were to happen, then the flow of crude oil will be cut from the Strait of Hormuz in the Gulf. About 17 percent of the oil traded worldwide, flows through the strait every day.

Mr.Rahimi made his comments to Iran's state news agency. Iran has defiantly expanded nuclear activity despite four rounds of U.N. sanctions imposed since 2006 over its refusal to suspend sensitive uranium enrichment and open up to U.N. nuclear inspectors and investigators.

The latest report by the U.N. nuclear watchdog found definite signs of moves by the Iranians to build an atomic weapon. Analysts say that if Iran were to stop the flow of oil through the Strait of Hormuz such a move could trigger military conflict with economies dependent on Gulf oil.



Israeli president sides with protestors


Israel's president has urged Israelis to rally against extremism in what he called a fight for the soul of the nation.

Shimon Peres was speaking as activists gathered in the town of Beit Shemesh to show their anger over the way way some ultra-Orthodox Jews treat women. Two days of clashes in the town began after a girl said she was harassed on her way to school.

Some ultra-Orthodox in Beit Shemesh are seeking to segregate men and women. Mr Peres said the entire nations must be recruited in order to save the majority from the hands of a small minority.



Egyptian court bars virginity tests in military prisons


An Egyptian court has ordered forced virginity tests on female detainees in military prisons to be halted.The Cairo court made the decision after a case was brought by protester Samira Ibrahim.

She'd accused the Egyptian army of forcing her to undergo such a test after being detained during a protest in Tahrir Square in March. Human rights organisations say the Egyptian military has used the practice widely as a punishment.



Putin says no rerun of disputed vote, as key aid is reassigned


Facing a swelling wave of public anger over fraud-tainted elections, Prime Minister Vladimir Putin has rejected demands for a rerun of the vote. At the same time, the Kremlin has reassigned the architect of Mr. Putin's tightly controlled political system to a job with no apparent domestic political duties.

The order by President Dmitry Medvedev to make Vladislav Surkov a deputy prime minister in charge of economic modernization is being viewed as a

sign that Russia's leaders recognize the need for significant reform. Allegations of fraud in the Dec. 4 national parliamentary election sparked a wave of protests unprecedented in post-Soviet Russia. Mr. Putin accuses the protesters of lacking clear aims.



Two Swedish journalists jailed for 11 years by Ethiopia


Two Swedish journalists have been jailed for 11 years in Ethiopia for entering the country illegally and supporting terrorism. Martin Schibbye and Johan Persson were detained in July after they were captured in Ethiopia with rebels from the Ogaden National Liberation Front.

They were found guilty of the charges last week. Both said they were just carrying out their normal duties as journalists at the time they were detained. Their lawyer says a decision will be made later this week on whether the men will appeal the sentence.





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