Wednesday, November 30, 2011

News 11.30.2011

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Copyright (c) 2011 Radio Prague (Cesky Rozhlas 7 - Radio Praha)

News Wednesday, November 30th, 2011

By: Jan Richter

* The police are to charge two people in the case of a suspicious
purchase of Tatra trucks for the Czech military.

* The Slovak government has asked Czech doctors to temporarily step in
for their Slovak colleagues who are quitting their jobs en masse over
low salaries.

* The Czech government has tightened rules for calculating the contents
of active ingredients in cannabis.

* Czech Airlines might have to cancel dozens of its flights in coming
days due to a protest by pilots.

* Zdenek Miler, the author of the famous Czech cartoon character
Krtecek, or Little Mole, has died at the age of 90.

========================================================================
Police to charge two people in army's Tatra trucks deal
------------------------------------------------------------------------

The police are to charge two people in the case of the 2006 purchase of
Tatra trucks for the Czech army, prosecutors investigating the deal
said on Wednesday. They refused to specify the charges or who will be
charged; according to the daily Mlada fronta Dnes, the police are going
to charge former defence minister Martin Bartak and arms dealer Michal
Smrz.

The 2.7-billion-crown deal to buy 555 Tatra trucks for the Czech army
was sealed in December 2006. The police launched investigation into the
purchase last year, after the head of Tatra's board of directors, and
former US ambassador to Prague, William Cabaniss, said he was asked for
a bribe by then deputy defence minister Martin Bartak.


========================================================================
Slovak government asks Czech doctors to replace Slovak medics quitting
over low salaries
------------------------------------------------------------------------

The Slovak government has asked Czech doctors to temporarily step in
for their Slovak colleagues who are quitting en masse in a labour
dispute over low salaries, a spokesman for the Czech Health Ministry
said on Wednesday. 2,000 out of 7,000 Slovak doctors handed in their
notices that will expire on December 1. Czech Health Minister Leos
Heger said he would inform Czech hospital doctors of the offer;
however, most experts are sceptical about a potential influx of Czech
doctors to Slovakia. For his part, the head of the Czech doctors'
labour union, Martin Engel, said he would ask medics to ignore the
appeal so as not to break their Slovak colleagues' protest.


========================================================================
Government tightens rules for calculating THC contents in cannabis
------------------------------------------------------------------------

The Czech government on Wednesday tightened the rules for calculating
the volume of active ingredients in cannabis; by January 2012, the
volume of active ingredients in cannabis will be calculated from the
flowers of marihuana plants, rather than from entire plants. Justice
Minister Jiri Pospisil said this will lower the threshold for growing
marihuana plants. Under Czech law, people can freely grow marihuana
plants with less than 0.3 percent contents of THC and other active
ingredients. Addressing complaints by Czech cacti growers, the
government also took mescaline off the list of illicit substances.


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Goverment approves land swap with Austria
------------------------------------------------------------------------

The Czech government approved on Wednesday a constitutional bill
slightly modifying a section of the border with Austria due to
anti-flood and water management measures. The legislation will mean the
exchange of some land near the South Moravian towns of Breclav and
Lanzhot with neighbouring Austria. The Czech Republic and Austria
agreed on the step on November 3 when the relevant treaty was signed.
The government will submit it for ratification to the Czech Parliament.
Under the treaty, the border will be now be delineated on the Dyje
river. The 24-hectare area is administered by Breclav and Lanzhot. The
acreage to be swapped is the same in Austria and the Czech Republic.


========================================================================
Czech airlines to cancel flights over pilots' protest
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Czech Airlines might have to cancel dozens of flights in the coming
days due to a protest by its pilots, a spokesman for the pilots'
association said on Wednesday. The pilots will co-ordinately take time
off to protest against a transfer of planes to a charter carrier
affiliated with Czech Airlines, a move they described as the start of
the firm's liquidation. Czech Airlines is yet to determine which
flights are likely to be cancelled.


========================================================================
Over 90,000 Czechs sign anti-government petition
------------------------------------------------------------------------

More than 90,000 Czechs have signed a petition initiated by the
opposition Social Democrats in protest against the government's reform
efforts, calling on the centre-right cabinet to step down, the
opposition party leader Bohuslav Sobotka, said on Wednesday. Mr Sobotka
said the petition, which was launched on November 1, was a great
success; however, the Social Democrats will not try to topple the
government in a vote of no-confidence, the opposition leader added.


========================================================================
Court rules reopening of Radovan Krejcir's case
------------------------------------------------------------------------

A court in Prague on Wednesday ruled to re-open the case of businessmen
Radovan Krejcir and Miroslav Provod who had been sentenced to five
years in prison for tax evasion. While Miroslav Provod served the
sentence, Radovan Krejcir fled the country and was later detained in
Switzerland where he is now held in custody, pending extradition to the
Czech Republic. The court's ruling has not yet come into effect; if it
does, it will render pointless the Czech authorities' petition for Mr
Krejcir's extradition.


========================================================================
Czechs bought less food, alcohol and cigarettes in 2010
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Czechs last year consumed less meat, milk products, fruit and
vegetables as well as alcohol and cigarettes, according to figures
released by the Czech Statistical Office on Wednesday. While a surge in
the consumption of potatoes and chicken rose in 2010, the average
consumption of meat dropped by 3.5 percent to less than 76 kilos per
person, while the consumption of fruit and vegetables decreased by 7
and two percent, respectively.


========================================================================
Zdenek Miler, author of Krtecek, dies aged 90
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Zdenek Miler, the creator of the famous Czech cartoon character
Krtecek, or Little Mole, died in a sanatorium outside Prague on
Wednesday at the age of 90, the news website idnes.cz reported. Zdenek
Miler authored more than 70 animated short films during his long
career, most of them featuring the popular character of the Little
Mole. A native of Kladno, central Bohemia, Zdenek Miler attended
Prague's Academy of Arts, Architecture and Design before joining the
Bata shoe company in Zlin in 1941. He made his first film in 1948; the
iconic Krtecek first appeared in his 1957 short entitled How the Little
Mole Got His Trousers.


========================================================================
Prague ranks as Europe's ninth most attractive city for tourists
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Prague has ranked as Europe's ninth most attractive capital for
tourists, according to a new study by the consultancy firm Roland
Berger released on Wednesday. The top three capitals are Paris,
Amsterdam and Rome. The head of Roland Berger's Czech branch,
Constantin Kinsky, said Prague lacked a clear tourism promotion
strategy, and also needed to improve its infrastructure. Mr Kinsky also
noted that while Prague was rich in historical heritage, it lacked live
culture that makes tourists come back.


========================================================================
Prague's Golden Well wins Grand Restaurant poll
------------------------------------------------------------------------

The Golden Well restaurant in Prague's Mala Strana has won the annual
Grand Restaurant poll, compiled by the respected food critic Pavel
Maurer, the daily Lidove noviny reported on Wednesday. Second and third
in the new poll came the Alcron and La Rotonde, respectively, both
parts of the Radisson Blu Alcron Hotel in Prague. The only Czech
restaurant with a Michelin star, Allegro in Prague's Four Seasons
Hotel, was not included in this year's Grand Restaurant poll as it is
temporarily closed for renovation.


========================================================================
Weather
------------------------------------------------------------------------

The next few days will be mostly overcast, with fog and occasional
drizzle. Daytime highs will range between 4 and 8 degrees Celsius.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Articles posted on www.radio.cz today
------------------------------------------------------------------------

A tale of two restaurants
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Hrabal's book "I served the King of England" makes working in a
restaurant sound very dramatic, and very glamorous. But the novel also
suggests that such drama and glamour belong to a time now long gone. To
find out whether this was true, I visited two of Prague's most famous
restaurants, to talk to their owners about their work from day-to-day.

http://www.radio.cz/en/section/spotlight/a-tale-of-two-restaurants-1


Asbestos concerns rise as affected schools close
------------------------------------------------------------------------

The city hall in Ceske Budejovice closed three primary schools in a
housing estate this week after health workers discovered the presence
of carcinogenic asbestos. While teachers attempt to create alternative
plans for the several hundred students, asbestos concerns have returned
to the public awareness nationwide, and health officials warn that many
more public buildings may carry the same risks.

http://www.radio.cz/en/section/curraffrs/asbestos-concerns-rise-as-affected-schools-close


First gorilla born and raised in Prague zoo relocated to Spain
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Just two weeks after a newborn gorilla was transported from Prague to
Stuttgart following repeated failed attempts to reunite it with its
mother, Prague zoo has bid farewell to another gorilla, Moja, the first
low-land gorilla born and raised in captivity in the Czech Republic.
The animal has reached sexual maturity and her minders decided to move
her away to prevent in-breeding in the pack. Her new home is the
Cabarceno National Park in northern Spain where Moja was transported on
Tuesday.

http://www.radio.cz/en/section/curraffrs/first-gorilla-born-and-raised-in-prague-zoo-relocated-to-spain


------------------------------------------------------------------------
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Radio Prague Today 11.30.2011

Articles posted on www.radio.cz today

A tale of two restaurants

Hrabal's book "I served the King of England" makes working in a restaurant sound very dramatic, and very glamorous. But the novel also suggests that such drama and glamour belong to a time now long gone. To find out whether this was true, I visited two of Prague's most famous restaurants, to talk to their owners about their work from day-to-day.

Asbestos concerns rise as affected schools close

The city hall in České Budějovice closed three primary schools in a housing estate this week after health workers discovered the presence of carcinogenic asbestos. While teachers attempt to create alternative plans for the several hundred students, asbestos concerns have returned to the public awareness nationwide, and health officials warn that many more public buildings may carry the same risks.

First gorilla born and raised in Prague zoo relocated to Spain

Just two weeks after a newborn gorilla was transported from Prague to Stuttgart following repeated failed attempts to reunite it with its mother, Prague zoo has bid farewell to another gorilla, Moja, the first low-land gorilla born and raised in captivity in the Czech Republic. The animal has reached sexual maturity and her minders decided to move her away to prevent in-breeding in the pack. Her new home is the Cabárceno National Park in northern Spain where Moja was transported on Tuesday.

NEWS /www.nrcu.gov.ua/

Dear subscriber!

We offer you most recent news by this moment on air at National radio company of
Ukraine. To read these news items in full, please, refer to our site
www.nrcu.gov.ua.

Sincerely yours, administrator.
webadm@nrcu.gov.ua
-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
2011-11-30 16:27:00
Yanukovych leaves on state visit to Israel.
From November 30 to December 1, President Viktor Yanukovych of Ukraine will pay
a state visit to Israel. During the visit, it is planned to hold talks with
Israeli President Shimon Peres and Prime Minister BenjaminNetanyahu.
http://www.nrcu.gov.ua/index.php?id=148&listid=158184

2011-11-30 16:12:00
State is unable to satisfy all legal claims of retired beneficiaries, Premier
says.
This was stated by Prime Minister Mykola Azarov at a unification congress of the
Federation of Employers of Ukraine.He said that high pensions will be paid only
to those who really lost their health by taking part in liquidation of the
Chornobylaccident.
http://www.nrcu.gov.ua/index.php?id=148&listid=158174

2011-11-30 16:09:00
In Ukraine, weekly flu and acute respiratory viral infections sick rate grows.
However, the level of vaccination against these diseases is extremely low and is
below one percent, doctors are concerned.
http://www.nrcu.gov.ua/index.php?id=148&listid=158205

2011-11-30 15:41:00
Queue of trucks at Ukrainian-Slovak border decreased.
The queue of trucks at the Ukrainian-Slovak border decreased - more than 120
cars were checked over last night , over 60 trucks are left in queue before the
check point.
http://www.nrcu.gov.ua/index.php?id=148&listid=158203

2011-11-30 15:36:00
As of November 1 one million 200 thousand claims presented to local courts.
This was disclosed by Head of the Pension Fund Borys Zaichuk They are related to
payment of arrears on pensions to populations entitled to benefits totaling
almost UAH 6, 5 billion, including from victims of the Chornobyl accident - 115,
000 claims amounting to UAH 1, 8billion.
http://www.nrcu.gov.ua/index.php?id=148&listid=158201

2011-11-30 15:09:00
Judicial decisions regarding payment of pensions to be thoroughly examined.
Prime Minister Mykola Azarov required to carefully consider judicial decisions
regarding payment of arrears on pensions to populations entitled to benefits. He
said this during a Cabinet meeting.
http://www.nrcu.gov.ua/index.php?id=148&listid=158199

2011-11-30 14:54:00
Klitschko-Mormeck bout to be broadcast in 120 countries.
World heavyweight champion Wladimir Klitschko of Ukraine will defend his titles
against French veteran, former world cruiserweight champion Jean-Marc Mormeck,
at the Esprit Arena stadium in Dusseldorf (Germany) on December10.
http://www.nrcu.gov.ua/index.php?id=148&listid=158194

2011-11-30 14:47:00
Hungary ready to invest about USD 1 billion in Ukrainian economy.
The trade turnover between Ukraine and Hungary in the first ten months of 2011
increased by 35% compared to the same period last year. The two countries are
planning to double this figure and reach the level of USD 4.5billion.
http://www.nrcu.gov.ua/index.php?id=148&listid=158192

2011-11-30 14:41:00
Ukraine, Russia agree on mechanism of demarcation work.
This was disclosed by director of the information policy department of the
Ukrainian Foreign Ministry, Oleh Voloshyn who said that the sides were
discussing the relevant issues at the next meeting of the joint
Ukrainian-Russian demarcation commission inMoscow.
http://www.nrcu.gov.ua/index.php?id=148&listid=158189

2011-11-30 14:36:00
Required number of vaccines purchased by Ukraine.
It will ensure timely implementation of mandatory vaccination calendar for
children.This was disclosed by chief expert of public health and sanitary and
epidemiological welfare department under Ministry of Health SergeyPlatov.
http://www.nrcu.gov.ua/index.php?id=148&listid=158188


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RCI Cyberjournal

Edition 29 November 2011
Canadian International Financial Sports Weather
Canadian

Canada won't obstruct cllmate change talks


The Canadian government promises not to play an obstructionist role in the current round of climate talks. Environment Minister Peter Kent says Canada won't stand in the way of other countries who want to make a second commitment to the Kyoto Protocol on Climate Change. For the second day in a row Mr. Kent isn't denying reports Canada plans to withdraw from the 1997 Kyoto agreement.

Critics have said that even if Canada pulls out, it could continue to be a negotiator on the next climate-change deal and seek to water down the accord for those who stay on. Mr. Kent says Canada won't make a second commitment to Kyoto because the accord doesn't include some of the world's biggest emitters, like the United States, India and China. He says he's going to this week's summit in South Africa to advance the cause of a new climate-change agreement that will eclipse Kyoto.



Minister wonders where stricken Ontario reserve's money went


Ontario Aboriginal Affairs Minister John Duncan says he wants to know why housing conditions on a Northern Ontario reserve are so poor, given all the money spent on trying to improve them. A 2010 audit of on-reserve housing found the Aboriginal Affairs department wasn't explicitly tracking the money it spends on housing, so it can't say whether it achieves results.

The audit also found that government officials don't regularly check up on housing projects and when they do, they don't document what they find. The Ontario reserve of Attawapiskat is currently in a state of emergency over housing, with families living in tents and trailers despite the community receiving millions in federal housing funds over the last five years.



Petition raised against shale gas in NB


A Conservative member of the New Brunswick legislature has presented a nearly 16,000-name petition calling on his own government to put a ban on shale gas exploration. Tory Kirk MacDonald presented the petition Tuesday in the legislature and also signed the petition himself. The signatures were collected by the Conservation Council of New Brunswick.

The Conservative government is supporting shale gas development, but has promised to develop strict regulations. All 13 members of the Liberal Opposition also presented petitions Tuesday calling for a halt to shale gas exploration. The Liberals have asked the government to put a moratorium on shale gas exploration and create a select committee of the legislature to study the issue. Natural Resources Minister Bruce Northrup said there will be no moratorium.



Federal minister defends public broadcaster


Canada's heritage minister says if Canadian Broadcasting Corp. TV anchor Peter Mansbridge wants to tell Canadians his salary, that's up to him, but James Moore says legislation prevents the government from doing so itself. The declaration came after Mr. Moore delivered a staunch defence of the public broadcaster amid calls by some caucus colleagues to end federal support for the 75-year-old institution.

The minister says it's in the best interests of the CBC to be as transparent as possible in the face of public scrutiny. Mr. Moore says CBC, which receives $1.1 billion in federal funding each year, should be "open and accountable for every dime that they get from taxpayers." He also says CBC won't be immune from government-wide budget cuts. But he says the public broadcaster plays an important role that private broadcasters do not or cannot fill.





International

Egypt's military takes credit for smooth vote


Egypt's military rulers were quick to take credit Tuesday for a strong turnout in the first elections since Hosni Mubarak's ouster, a vote that appeared to be the country's freest and fairest in living memory. The military did not field candidates in the parliamentary vote. But showing a smooth, successful and virtually fraud-free election would significantly boost the ruling generals in their bitter struggle with youthful protesters in Cairo's Tahrir Square calling for them to transfer power immediately to a civilian authority.

Even before two days of voting began Monday, protesters were accusing the military of trying to cling to power and safeguard its interests under any future government. Now, they warn the ruling council will try to use the success of the election to cement its

hold on power.



New Yemeni leader will announce cabinet


Yemen's prime minister-designate promised on Tuesday to announce his government within days, saying Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates would help the country with oil and electricity as it tries to pull back from the brink of civil war. Mohammed Basindwa, a former foreign minister, has been charged under a Gulf-brokered peace plan with forming the interim cabinet after President Ali Abdullah Saleh handed power to his deputy following 10 months of protests seeking his overthrow.

Yemeni Vice President Abd-Rabbu Mansour Hadi, who has been empowered to run the country during an interim period, has called an early presidential election on Feb. 21, 2012 as part of the Gulf Coooperation Council initiative. Mr. Hadi named Mr. Basindwa, who joined the opposition during the protests, as interim premier on Sunday.



Nigerian lawmakers would ban same-sex unions


Nigeria's senate passed a bill on Tuesday outlawing same-sex marriage in Africa's most populous country as well as banning public displays of affection between homosexual couples. The bill, which still must be approved by the House of Representatives and signed by President Goodluck Jonathan, spells out a 14-year jail term for anyone involved in same-sex marriages.

The bill says those who abet or aid such unions could be given 10 years, as would "any person who registers, operates or participates in gay clubs... or directly or indirectly makes public show of same sex amorous relationships."



Pakistan withdraws from Afghanistan conference


Pakistan has pulled out of an international conference on the future of Afghanistan next week to protest against a NATO cross-border attack that killed 24 of its soldiers and plunged the region deeper into crisis. The decision not to attend the conference in the German city of Bonn, aimed at bringing together major stakeholders in securing an Afghan peace after NATO combat troops leave at the end of 2014, could mean Pakistan won't use its influence with Taliban militants to bring them to the peace table.

Bonn was never intended to produce firm financial commitments but it was organized with the expectation that the United States and Afghanistan would have pinned down a strategic partnership deal defining their relationship after the departure of foreign combat troops, due to be complete by the end of 2014.



Turkey turns up heat on Syria


Turkey said Tuesday it will consider using Iraq as an alternative transit route for trade with the Middle East, cutting out Syria entirely as Damascus faces broad economic sanctions over its deadly crackdown on an 8-month-old uprising. Syria has been a main transit route for Middle East trade, which Damascus hopes will help cushion the effects of tough new sanctions from the Arab League and Turkey.

On Monday, Syria warned that Damascus could use its strategic location to inflict economic damage of its own. But Turkey's transport minister said there are alternatives to Syria. Binali Yildirim says old the state-run Anadolu Agency on Tuesday. He said Turkey would increase the number of border gates with Iraq in such an event. Syria has come under mounting international pressure over its crackdown. Sunday's decision by the Arab League to impose sanctions was an unprecedented move by the 22-member League against a fellow Arab state. The Arab sanctions were expected to hurt far more than existing sanctions from the U.S. and the European Union, who had far more limited trade with Damascus.



Pressure grows on Chinese artist


The wife of Chinese dissident artist Ai Weiwei said on Tuesday police treated her as a "criminal suspect" when they took her away for three hours ofquestioning, in a sign that Beijing is stepping up efforts to intimidate Mr. Ai, its most famous social critic. Lu Qing, 47, was the latest person linked to Ai to be taken in for questioning. But Mrs. Lu, who was released soon after, said police officers could not tell her what kind of crime she was suspected of committing.

Mr. Ai, whose 81-day secret detention earlier this year ignited an international uproar, was released in late June. He and his supporters said he was the victim of the ruling Communist Party's crackdown on dissent. The government accused him of tax evasion, a charge he denied.



Italy's borrowing costs soar


Euro zone ministers struggled to boost the firepower of their rescue fund and looked to the IMF for more help on Tuesday after Italy's borrowing costs hit a euro lifetime high of nearly 8 percent. Two years into Europe's sovereign debt crisis, investors are fleeing the euro zone bond market, European banks are dumping government debt, deposits are draining from south European banks and a looming recession is aggravating the pain, fuelling doubts about the survival of the single currency.

Italy had to offer a record 7.89 percent yield to sell 3-year bonds, a stunning leap from the 4.93 percent it paid in late October, and 7.56 percent for 10-year bonds, compared with 6.06 percent at that time. The yields were above levels at which Greece, Ireland and Portugal applied for international bailouts.



U.S. airline goes into bankruptcy


American Airlines and its parent company filed for bankruptcy protection as they try to cut costs and unload massive debt built up by years of high fuel prices and labour struggles.

There will be no impact on travellers for now. AMR Corp. has continued to lose money while other U.S. airlines returned to profitability in the last two years. American said it would operate normally while it reorganizes in bankruptcy. The airline said it would continue to operate flights, honour tickets and take reservations. American was the only major U.S. airline that didn't file for bankruptcy protection in the aftermath of the 2001 terrorist attacks that triggered a deep slump in the airline industry.





Financial

Western pipeline gets poor report card


Enbridge Inc.'s proposed $5.5-billion pipeline to British Columbia poses huge environmental risks, according to a new report that signals the project will become the next battleground over the future of Canada's oilsands. The study by three environmental groups, released on Tuesday, after a decision to push back approval of TransCanada Corp's Alberta-to-Texas Keystone XL pipeline by more than a year. The delay has led the Canada's oil industry and Prime Minister Stephen Harper's government to intensify their emphasis on exporting oil sands-derived crude to Asia.

The Enbridge project, known as the Northern Gateway pipeline, is the first attempt at doing that in scale. But the new report issued by the Natural Resources Defense Council, Pembina Institute and Living Oceans Society says the project would threaten native communities, salmon fishery and wildlife habitat on land and in waters off the West Coast. The report cites last year's Enbridge pipeline rupture and oil spill in Michigan as an example of why governments and regulators should block the plan. Northern Gateway would move 525,000 barrels of crude a day to the port of Kitimat, where it would be loaded onto tankers and shipped to Pacific Rim refiners.



China coal market a godsend


One of Canada's biggest coal producers says the Chinese market is a buffer from problems caused by Europe's national debt crisis. Teck Resources |Ltd. CEO Don Lindsay says fears about the European crisis will make steelmakers there wary of building up their inventories in the near future. But Mr. Lindsay told a mining conference in Toronto on Tuesday that the steel industry in China is still growing although not as fast. At the same time, China's domestic coal sources are becoming harder to mine and their labour costs are rising.

Teck has been increasing production at its five coal mines in B.C. and one in Alberta. Coal accounts for about one-half of the company's revenues.



New potash investment for SK


A German fertilizer company has approved C$3.25 billion in spending for a new potash mine in Saskatchewan that will create up to 1,300 jobs. The K+S group said Tuesday it expects to have more than 1,000 people working on construction at peak periods and employ 300 at the mine when the operation hits full production. Saskatchewan has the world's largest deposits of potash, a valuable mineral mainly used in fertilizer.

Other companies, including, Potash Corp. of Saskatchewan and Anglo-Australian mining giant BHP Billiton, are also expanding or building new mines in the Prairie province. Chinese companies are also acquiring stakes in potash developments in the province. Demand for fertilizer is soaring in China and India as farmers seek to increase crop yields to feed growing populations. Production from the proposed Legacy mine, about 50 kilometres north of Moose Jaw, SK, is expected to begin in 2015.



Markets


TSX on Tuesday: 11,728 + 87. Dollar: US.97. Euro: $1.37. Oil: $99.78 + $1.57.





Sports

Sports


CURLING

Some of the top curlers in the country are in Cranbrook, BC, this week for the Capital One Canada Cup. Competition begins Wednesday, the finals are Sunday and the winning men's and women's teams will earn a berth in the 2013 Canadian Olympic curling trials in Winnipeg.





Weather

Weather


British Columbia on Wednesday: mix sun cloud, high C7 Vancouver. Yukon, Northwest Territories: mix sun cloud. Nunavut: snow. Whitehorse 2, Yellowknife -23, Iqaluit -28. Alberta, Saskatchewan: snow. Manitoba: cloud. Edmonton -3, Regina, Winnipeg -1. Ontario: mix snow rain. Quebec: rain. Toronto 4, Ottawa 6, Montreal 11. Maritimes: rain. Newfoundland and Labrador: cloud. Fredericton, Halifax, Charlottetown 14, St. John's 6.





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RCI Cyberjournal

Canada won't obstruct cllmate change talks


The Canadian government promises not to play an obstructionist role in the current round of climate talks. Environment Minister Peter Kent says Canada won't stand in the way of other countries who want to make a second commitment to the Kyoto Protocol on Climate Change. For the second day in a row Mr. Kent isn't denying reports Canada plans to withdraw from the 1997 Kyoto agreement.

Critics have said that even if Canada pulls out, it could continue to be a negotiator on the next climate-change deal and seek to water down the accord for those who stay on. Mr. Kent says Canada won't make a second commitment to Kyoto because the accord doesn't include some of the world's biggest emitters, like the United States, India and China. He says he's going to this week's summit in South Africa to advance the cause of a new climate-change agreement that will eclipse Kyoto.

Minister wonders where stricken Ontario reserve's money went


Ontario Aboriginal Affairs Minister John Duncan says he wants to know why housing conditions on a Northern Ontario reserve are so poor, given all the money spent on trying to improve them. A 2010 audit of on-reserve housing found the Aboriginal Affairs department wasn't explicitly tracking the money it spends on housing, so it can't say whether it achieves results.

The audit also found that government officials don't regularly check up on housing projects and when they do, they don't document what they find. The Ontario reserve of Attawapiskat is currently in a state of emergency over housing, with families living in tents and trailers despite the community receiving millions in federal housing funds over the last five years.

Petition raised against shale gas in NB


A Conservative member of the New Brunswick legislature has presented a nearly 16,000-name petition calling on his own government to put a ban on shale gas exploration. Tory Kirk MacDonald presented the petition Tuesday in the legislature and also signed the petition himself. The signatures were collected by the Conservation Council of New Brunswick.

The Conservative government is supporting shale gas development, but has promised to develop strict regulations. All 13 members of the Liberal Opposition also presented petitions Tuesday calling for a halt to shale gas exploration. The Liberals have asked the government to put a moratorium on shale gas exploration and create a select committee of the legislature to study the issue. Natural Resources Minister Bruce Northrup said there will be no moratorium.

Federal minister defends public broadcaster


Canada's heritage minister says if Canadian Broadcasting Corp. TV anchor Peter Mansbridge wants to tell Canadians his salary, that's up to him, but James Moore says legislation prevents the government from doing so itself. The declaration came after Mr. Moore delivered a staunch defence of the public broadcaster amid calls by some caucus colleagues to end federal support for the 75-year-old institution.

The minister says it's in the best interests of the CBC to be as transparent as possible in the face of public scrutiny. Mr. Moore says CBC, which receives $1.1 billion in federal funding each year, should be "open and accountable for every dime that they get from taxpayers." He also says CBC won't be immune from government-wide budget cuts. But he says the public broadcaster plays an important role that private broadcasters do not or cannot fill.


Egypt's military takes credit for smooth vote


Egypt's military rulers were quick to take credit Tuesday for a strong turnout in the first elections since Hosni Mubarak's ouster, a vote that appeared to be the country's freest and fairest in living memory. The military did not field candidates in the parliamentary vote. But showing a smooth, successful and virtually fraud-free election would significantly boost the ruling generals in their bitter struggle with youthful protesters in Cairo's Tahrir Square calling for them to transfer power immediately to a civilian authority.

Even before two days of voting began Monday, protesters were accusing the military of trying to cling to power and safeguard its interests under any future government. Now, they warn the ruling council will try to use the success of the election to cement its

hold on power.

New Yemeni leader will announce cabinet


Yemen's prime minister-designate promised on Tuesday to announce his government within days, saying Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates would help the country with oil and electricity as it tries to pull back from the brink of civil war. Mohammed Basindwa, a former foreign minister, has been charged under a Gulf-brokered peace plan with forming the interim cabinet after President Ali Abdullah Saleh handed power to his deputy following 10 months of protests seeking his overthrow.

Yemeni Vice President Abd-Rabbu Mansour Hadi, who has been empowered to run the country during an interim period, has called an early presidential election on Feb. 21, 2012 as part of the Gulf Coooperation Council initiative. Mr. Hadi named Mr. Basindwa, who joined the opposition during the protests, as interim premier on Sunday.

Nigerian lawmakers would ban same-sex unions


Nigeria's senate passed a bill on Tuesday outlawing same-sex marriage in Africa's most populous country as well as banning public displays of affection between homosexual couples. The bill, which still must be approved by the House of Representatives and signed by President Goodluck Jonathan, spells out a 14-year jail term for anyone involved in same-sex marriages.

The bill says those who abet or aid such unions could be given 10 years, as would "any person who registers, operates or participates in gay clubs... or directly or indirectly makes public show of same sex amorous relationships."

Pakistan withdraws from Afghanistan conference


Pakistan has pulled out of an international conference on the future of Afghanistan next week to protest against a NATO cross-border attack that killed 24 of its soldiers and plunged the region deeper into crisis. The decision not to attend the conference in the German city of Bonn, aimed at bringing together major stakeholders in securing an Afghan peace after NATO combat troops leave at the end of 2014, could mean Pakistan won't use its influence with Taliban militants to bring them to the peace table.

Bonn was never intended to produce firm financial commitments but it was organized with the expectation that the United States and Afghanistan would have pinned down a strategic partnership deal defining their relationship after the departure of foreign combat troops, due to be complete by the end of 2014.

Turkey turns up heat on Syria


Turkey said Tuesday it will consider using Iraq as an alternative transit route for trade with the Middle East, cutting out Syria entirely as Damascus faces broad economic sanctions over its deadly crackdown on an 8-month-old uprising. Syria has been a main transit route for Middle East trade, which Damascus hopes will help cushion the effects of tough new sanctions from the Arab League and Turkey.

On Monday, Syria warned that Damascus could use its strategic location to inflict economic damage of its own. But Turkey's transport minister said there are alternatives to Syria. Binali Yildirim says old the state-run Anadolu Agency on Tuesday. He said Turkey would increase the number of border gates with Iraq in such an event. Syria has come under mounting international pressure over its crackdown. Sunday's decision by the Arab League to impose sanctions was an unprecedented move by the 22-member League against a fellow Arab state. The Arab sanctions were expected to hurt far more than existing sanctions from the U.S. and the European Union, who had far more limited trade with Damascus.

Pressure grows on Chinese artist


The wife of Chinese dissident artist Ai Weiwei said on Tuesday police treated her as a "criminal suspect" when they took her away for three hours ofquestioning, in a sign that Beijing is stepping up efforts to intimidate Mr. Ai, its most famous social critic. Lu Qing, 47, was the latest person linked to Ai to be taken in for questioning. But Mrs. Lu, who was released soon after, said police officers could not tell her what kind of crime she was suspected of committing.

Mr. Ai, whose 81-day secret detention earlier this year ignited an international uproar, was released in late June. He and his supporters said he was the victim of the ruling Communist Party's crackdown on dissent. The government accused him of tax evasion, a charge he denied.

Italy's borrowing costs soar


Euro zone ministers struggled to boost the firepower of their rescue fund and looked to the IMF for more help on Tuesday after Italy's borrowing costs hit a euro lifetime high of nearly 8 percent. Two years into Europe's sovereign debt crisis, investors are fleeing the euro zone bond market, European banks are dumping government debt, deposits are draining from south European banks and a looming recession is aggravating the pain, fuelling doubts about the survival of the single currency.

Italy had to offer a record 7.89 percent yield to sell 3-year bonds, a stunning leap from the 4.93 percent it paid in late October, and 7.56 percent for 10-year bonds, compared with 6.06 percent at that time. The yields were above levels at which Greece, Ireland and Portugal applied for international bailouts.

U.S. airline goes into bankruptcy


American Airlines and its parent company filed for bankruptcy protection as they try to cut costs and unload massive debt built up by years of high fuel prices and labour struggles.

There will be no impact on travellers for now. AMR Corp. has continued to lose money while other U.S. airlines returned to profitability in the last two years. American said it would operate normally while it reorganizes in bankruptcy. The airline said it would continue to operate flights, honour tickets and take reservations. American was the only major U.S. airline that didn't file for bankruptcy protection in the aftermath of the 2001 terrorist attacks that triggered a deep slump in the airline industry.


Western pipeline gets poor report card


Enbridge Inc.'s proposed $5.5-billion pipeline to British Columbia poses huge environmental risks, according to a new report that signals the project will become the next battleground over the future of Canada's oilsands. The study by three environmental groups, released on Tuesday, after a decision to push back approval of TransCanada Corp's Alberta-to-Texas Keystone XL pipeline by more than a year. The delay has led the Canada's oil industry and Prime Minister Stephen Harper's government to intensify their emphasis on exporting oil sands-derived crude to Asia.

The Enbridge project, known as the Northern Gateway pipeline, is the first attempt at doing that in scale. But the new report issued by the Natural Resources Defense Council, Pembina Institute and Living Oceans Society says the project would threaten native communities, salmon fishery and wildlife habitat on land and in waters off the West Coast. The report cites last year's Enbridge pipeline rupture and oil spill in Michigan as an example of why governments and regulators should block the plan. Northern Gateway would move 525,000 barrels of crude a day to the port of Kitimat, where it would be loaded onto tankers and shipped to Pacific Rim refiners.

China coal market a godsend


One of Canada's biggest coal producers says the Chinese market is a buffer from problems caused by Europe's national debt crisis. Teck Resources |Ltd. CEO Don Lindsay says fears about the European crisis will make steelmakers there wary of building up their inventories in the near future. But Mr. Lindsay told a mining conference in Toronto on Tuesday that the steel industry in China is still growing although not as fast. At the same time, China's domestic coal sources are becoming harder to mine and their labour costs are rising.

Teck has been increasing production at its five coal mines in B.C. and one in Alberta. Coal accounts for about one-half of the company's revenues.

New potash investment for SK


A German fertilizer company has approved C$3.25 billion in spending for a new potash mine in Saskatchewan that will create up to 1,300 jobs. The K+S group said Tuesday it expects to have more than 1,000 people working on construction at peak periods and employ 300 at the mine when the operation hits full production. Saskatchewan has the world's largest deposits of potash, a valuable mineral mainly used in fertilizer.

Other companies, including, Potash Corp. of Saskatchewan and Anglo-Australian mining giant BHP Billiton, are also expanding or building new mines in the Prairie province. Chinese companies are also acquiring stakes in potash developments in the province. Demand for fertilizer is soaring in China and India as farmers seek to increase crop yields to feed growing populations. Production from the proposed Legacy mine, about 50 kilometres north of Moose Jaw, SK, is expected to begin in 2015.

Markets


TSX on Tuesday: 11,728 + 87. Dollar: US.97. Euro: $1.37. Oil: $99.78 + $1.57.


Sports


CURLING

Some of the top curlers in the country are in Cranbrook, BC, this week for the Capital One Canada Cup. Competition begins Wednesday, the finals are Sunday and the winning men's and women's teams will earn a berth in the 2013 Canadian Olympic curling trials in Winnipeg.


Weather


British Columbia on Wednesday: mix sun cloud, high C7 Vancouver. Yukon, Northwest Territories: mix sun cloud. Nunavut: snow. Whitehorse 2, Yellowknife -23, Iqaluit -28. Alberta, Saskatchewan: snow. Manitoba: cloud. Edmonton -3, Regina, Winnipeg -1. Ontario: mix snow rain. Quebec: rain. Toronto 4, Ottawa 6, Montreal 11. Maritimes: rain. Newfoundland and Labrador: cloud. Fredericton, Halifax, Charlottetown 14, St. John's 6.

Tuesday, November 29, 2011

News 11.29.2011

------------------------------------------------------------------------
Copyright (c) 2011 Radio Prague (Cesky Rozhlas 7 - Radio Praha)

News Tuesday, November 29th, 2011

By: Christian Falvey

* The Ministry of Industry and Trade is considering cancelling a
long-running health subsidy for miners, the daily Pravo reports.

* Police in Prague city centre have discovered two small children whose
parents had never taken them outdoors, the daily Mlada fronta Dnes
reports.

* Prime Minister Petr Necas has met with his Moldavian counterpart and
confirmed Czech developmental aid for the country next year.

* The Prague City Council has scrapped a controversial, ten-year tender
for waste management.

* A court has granted an early release to Barbora Skrlova, who was
sentenced to five years for her part in the "Kurim" child abuse case.

========================================================================
Industry Ministry considering cancelling health subsidy for miners
------------------------------------------------------------------------

The Ministry of Industry and Trade is considering cancelling a
long-running health subsidy for miners, the daily Pravo reports. The
subsidy entails 1,500 to 1,900 crowns in compensation per month paid by
the employer to miners who leave their jobs for health reasons and has
been in place since 1993. The cancellation of the subsidy would change
nothing in the state's budget but would mean savings of up to 50
million crowns for large coal mining companies. According to documents
that the paper says it possesses, the ministry believes the subsidy
reflects a time when miners faced worse conditions in their work
environments and a greater risk of illness. The miners' union, which is
protesting the move, says that hardly anything has changed in that time
and that the idea is needless provocation.


========================================================================
Children who never left their home found in central Prague
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Police in Prague city centre have discovered two small children whose
parents had never taken them outdoors, the daily Mlada fronta Dnes
reports. The children - a boy aged three and an 18-month-old girl -
were apparently born at home, had never been taken to a doctor and were
in good physical but poor psychological condition. The paper says that
the parents were trying to protect the children from an "evil world"
and had lost interest in them after they were touched by another
person. They are now in the care of their grandparents after being
taken to a children's centre. Police will not say whether the parents
will be prosecuted.


========================================================================
Necas meets with Moldavian PM, confirms developmental aid for 2012
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Prime Minister Petr Necas says that Moldavia will be one of five
priority countries for Czech developmental aid next year. Speaking to
the press after a meeting with his Moldavian counterpart, Vlad Filat,
Mr Necas said that the small East European country was a priority for
the Visegrad Group as a whole, on account of its reform efforts and
pro-European stance. He also noted that Moldavia offers opportunities
for Czech investment, particularly in the areas of energy and
transportation infrastructure. The Czech Press Agency says that
Moldavia is to receive 66.5 million crowns in developmental aid from
the Czech Republic next year. Prior to the press conference, Czech and
Moldavian officials signed bilateral agreements on the return of
illegal aliens, cooperation in health care and social security.


========================================================================
New Prague coalition meeting cancels waste tender, agrees 2012 budget
------------------------------------------------------------------------

The Prague City Council has scrapped a controversial, ten-year tender
for waste management. Critics said the order was overpriced. Its value
was estimated at 13.2 billion crowns, but the lowest bid was more than
three billion higher. The planned tender was sharply criticised by TOP
09, then in opposition in City Hall. The Czech capital will have a
budget of 44 billion crowns and will have an additional eight billion
for investment. Mayor Bohuslav Svoboda has said that the city plans to
cut all current expenditures by five percent. As of last Thursday, six
members from the TOP 09 party have joined the council, replacing the
Social Democrat representation from the grand coalition that was
dissolved last week.


========================================================================
Barbora Skrlova granted early release from prison
------------------------------------------------------------------------

A district court has freed Barbora Skrlova, who was sentenced to five
years for her part in the "Kurim" child abuse case. The 36-year-old
woman was released two and a half years early after a fierce debate in
court between the state prosecutor and her lawyer, who says her
psychological condition has not improved in prison. The prosecution
maintained that Ms Skrlova behaves like a sullen child but is actually
a skilled manipulator. Her case began in 2007, when six individuals
linked to a small religious sect were charged with violently abusing
two children. Skrlova pretended to be one of the children and was taken
into childcare from which she escaped. She was later found in Norway
after her true identity was revealed. She will remain on probation for
five years.


========================================================================
Czech Position: Lawyer Fagan to file lawsuit against the Czech Republic
------------------------------------------------------------------------

The website Czech Position reports that controversial American lawyer
Edward Fagan is filing a lawsuit against the Czech Republic, its
finance minister and several other people regarding unpaid bonds issued
by the town of Karlovy Vary in 1924. Mr Fagan says the suit, which is
to be filed in the US, is based on his having been denied cooperation
in verifying whether the state fulfilled its financial liabilities
arising from the bonds. He is reportedly also threatening to prevent
the state from issuing further bonds. The Finance Ministry rejected Mr
Fagan's 500-million-dollar claim for the bonds, which were sold in the
United States. The Czech Finance Ministry says such claims have been
barred for years and that Czechoslovak authorities negotiated a
memorandum with the bond holders in 1984.


========================================================================
Public Affairs to lodge criminal complaint over IZIP
------------------------------------------------------------------------

The junior coalition party, Public Affairs, will lodge a criminal
complaint against General Health Insurance Company (VZP) board members
who promoted a project for electronic health records called IZIP and
were simultaneously its shareholders. The party also asked its
representatives on the board of the state-run VZP, the country��s
biggest health insurer, to propose the dismissal of VZP board chairman
and director Pavel Horak. Party chairman Radek John said he will not
yet specify who the complaint has been lodged against. Controversies
that have accompanied IZIP project for the last decade have intensified
in recent weeks, since VZP procured 51% of the company's shares. The
remaining 49% is in the possession of an unknown Swiss company to which
the project��s founders transferred their shares earlier this year.


========================================================================
Statistical office reports on internet use
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Internet access in households has increased by 77% over the last five
years, the Czech Statistical Office reports. The office records 2.5
million connected households in the country (3 out of 5), and 2.7
million households with computers. The large increase may be due to the
popularity of wireless connections. More than a fourth of the
population over the age of 16, or 2.5 million people, use teh internets
for shopping. The most common online activities were reported to be
searching for information on goods and services, reading messages and
internet calling. About a quarter of the adult population said they
actively use social networks.


========================================================================
Agreement reached with land-owner for completion of D11 motorway
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Completion of the D11 motorway from Prague to Hradec Kralove looks set
to go ahead, as the farmer whose land obstructed the work has agreed to
sell it to the state for 90 million crowns. She will also be
compensated with other tracts of land. Negotiations for the purchase of
the ten hectares in question have been underway for 17 years.
Archaeological and geological is set to begin next year and the
motorway will be built between 2013 and 2014 at a cost of 1.5 billion
crowns.


========================================================================
Driest November on record
------------------------------------------------------------------------

The current month is set to become the driest November since
meteorological records began in 1775. The amount of precipitation was
virtually unmeasurable, with the last proper rain having fallen on
October 26. The Czech Meteorological Institute says that the average
daily precipitation of half a millimetre was not recorded anywhere in
the country in the last month. The dry spell is reportedly not causing
problems for farming at the moment. Rainfall is expected at the weekend
at the earliest.


========================================================================
Weather
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Conditions over the coming days are expected to be clear, with highs of
around 6o Celsius.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Articles posted on www.radio.cz today
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Ema Destinnova - the divine Ema
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Ema Destinnova - or Emmy Destinn, as she became known abroad - was one
of the greatest dramatic sopranos of the twentieth century and one of
the most sought-after singers before WWI, thanks to her voice of
exceptional richness, power, and control. She sang with the legendary
Enrico Caruso and many other stars in the most prestigious opera houses
in Europe and the United States, such as Bayreuth, Berlin's Hofoper,
London's Covent Garden and New York's Metropolitan.

http://www.radio.cz/en/section/czech-history/ema-destinnova-the-divine-ema


Prague police chief arrested, contracts frozen in anti-corruption sting
------------------------------------------------------------------------

The mayor of Prague has frozen all contracts signed by the City Police
force and ordered a full investigation after the head of the force was
arrested last week on suspicion of accepting a bribe. Vladimir Kotrous,
Prague City Police force president, is now in custody after
anti-organised crime taskforce arrested him with a large amount of cash
on his person.

http://www.radio.cz/en/section/curraffrs/prague-police-chief-arrested-contracts-frozen-in-anti-corruption-sting


Despite rising numbers of online homes, Czechs still behind EU average
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Over the past five years, the Czech Republic has seen a massive rise in
the numbers of internet users. According to the latest official
figures, the number of Czech homes connected to the worldwide web rose
by 125 percent over that period. But compared to other countries in the
European Union, the Czechs still lag behind.

http://www.radio.cz/en/section/curraffrs/despite-rising-numbers-of-online-homes-czechs-still-behind-eu-average


------------------------------------------------------------------------
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NEWS /www.nrcu.gov.ua/

Dear subscriber!

We offer you most recent news by this moment on air at National radio company of
Ukraine. To read these news items in full, please, refer to our site
www.nrcu.gov.ua.

Sincerely yours, administrator.
webadm@nrcu.gov.ua
-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
2011-11-29 16:39:00
Ukraine, Poland will maintain current momentum of bilateral relations.
President Viktor Yanukovych praised Poland's continued support for the EU
integration course of Ukraine. He said this after a meeting with his Polish
counterpart Bronislaw Komorowski in Kyiv on Monday.
http://www.nrcu.gov.ua/index.php?id=148&listid=158092

2011-11-29 16:12:00
Sugar production 42% up.
Sugar mills in Ukraine as of November 28, 2011 have produced 2.07 million tons
of sugar from beets of the new harvest, 41.8% more compared with the same date
last year, National Sugar Association Ukrtsukor said in astatement.
http://www.nrcu.gov.ua/index.php?id=148&listid=158107

2011-11-29 16:02:00
Azarov would be successful politician in U.S.
Well-known American television personality Larry King, who has held an interview
in Kyiv with Ukrainian Prime Minister Mykola Azarov, was pleased with the
meeting and open conversation.
http://www.nrcu.gov.ua/index.php?id=148&listid=158094

2011-11-29 15:53:00
Adoption of budget 2012 in present form will lead to social default.
Ukrainian budget for 2012 is the budget of social default, leader of the CPU and
the Parliamentary faction of Communists Petro Symonenko has said, the CPU press
service informs.
http://www.nrcu.gov.ua/index.php?id=148&listid=158097

2011-11-29 15:51:00
China to open its consulate in Odesa on November 29.
China's Deputy Foreign Minister Chen Guoping on Tuesday, November 29, will
officially unveil China's General Consulate in Odesa.
http://www.nrcu.gov.ua/index.php?id=148&listid=158096

2011-11-29 14:49:00
Czechs want to appoint new military attaches in Kyiv.
New Ambassador of the Czech Republic to Ukraine Ivan Pocuch hopes for an early
solution to the issue of appointing new Czech military diplomats in Ukraine
instead of two previously expelled after being charged of espionage, he told
Kommersant-Ukrainenewspaper.
http://www.nrcu.gov.ua/index.php?id=148&listid=158095

2011-11-29 13:10:00
Grain export 84% up in November - expert.
Grain export in Ukraine grew by 84% over the first 18 days against the previous
month. In particular, monthly export of corn from Ukraine may reach a
record-making volume after a forecast was announced about the yield of this
culture at 20 million tons, the largest over the recent time, and removal of
export duty. This opinion was expressed by director of the analytical company
ProAgro MykolaVernytsky.
http://www.nrcu.gov.ua/index.php?id=148&listid=158105

2011-11-29 12:58:00
EBRD persistently recommends Kyiv to resume negotiations with IMF.
Ukraine has to resume cooperation with the International Monetary Fund. This
opinion was expressed by EBRD senior regional economist for East European
countries and Caucuses Alexander Pivovarsky.
http://www.nrcu.gov.ua/index.php?id=148&listid=158099

2011-11-29 12:56:00
SBU catches employment center chiefs on bribe-taking.
The Security Service of Ukraine (SBU) has confirmed the detention of the head of
the State Employment Center of Volodymyr Halytsky. The official is suspected of
creating corruptive schemes and bribe-taking, the SBU said in a statementMonday.
http://www.nrcu.gov.ua/index.php?id=148&listid=158098

2011-11-29 12:09:00
70% of footwear in Ukraine made in China.
Today in Ukraine 70% of artificial leather shoes are made in China, president of
the League of Footwear Producers Oleksandr Borodynia said at a round table
"Prevention of Infringements of legislation on Protection of Economic
Competition in Non-FoodMarkets".
http://www.nrcu.gov.ua/index.php?id=148&listid=158104


-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=

RCI Cyberjournal

Edition 28 November 2011
Canadian International Financial Sports Weather
Canadian

Canada reported getting support against oilsands move in Europe


Canada is reported to be receiving help from the British government in the campaign to promote oil from the oilsands region in the western Canadian province of Alberta. The British newspaper The Guardian says Canada has won British support to fight a European proposal that the Canadian government is against. The proposal would officially label fuel from the oilsands as more polluting than conventional oil. The newspaper says the British government has come under pressure from energy giants Shell and BP, both of which have major oilsands projects in Alberta.



Pakistan bombing hampers Afghanistan evacuation


The Canadian military has acknowledged that the closure of the border between Afghanistan and Pakistan it making it harder to evacuate soldiers and equipment from Afghanistan. The evacuation is supposed to be complete by the end of the year. But Brig.-Gen. Charles Lamarre has told the Canadian Press that Pakistan's closure of its border to NATO convoys is complicating the process.

The government in Islamabad took the step in retaliation for the U.S. bombing near the brder during the weekend in which at least 24 Pakistani soldiers died. However, Gen. Lamarre says the seriousness of disruption shouldn't be exaggerated, predicting that economic factors will eventually pressure Pakistan to reopen the border.



Canadian minister cagey on climate accord


Canada's Environment Minister has declined to state whether his country is in or out of the Kyoto accord on climate change, despite the fact that Canada is a signatory to it. Peter Kent says Canada needs to move forward to implement the more recent climate agreements reached at Copenhagen, Denmark, and Cancun, Mexico. The minister referred to Kyoto as "the past."

A former Liberal Party government signed the Kyoto Protocol on Climate Change. But the current Conservative Party government has said its emissions-cutting targets are impossible of achievement. Mr. Kent's remarks coincided with the first day of the UN climate conference in Durban, South Africa. Delegates are charged with finding a new agreement. The Kyoto accord expires next year. Canada, Russia and Japan have already said they won't sign on to a new version of Kyoto



Canada wants further punishment of Syria


Canada's foreign minister, John Baird, has called on the United Nations to consider isolating Syria further. He says the Arab League, by imposing further sanctions against Syria, had sent an important signal that the country's behaviour will not be tolerated. Mr. Baird also urged Canadians in Syria to leave. Canada has imposed stiff sanctions on Syria that include travel restrictions and an asset freeze.



Red Cross moves to alleviate native housing crisis


The Canadian Red Cross is mobilizing to help the remote northern Ontario First Nations community of Attawapiskat with its housing crisis. The Red Cross says it's working closely with public authorities and the community to identify and address urgent, short-term needs. At the request of the community, the Red Cross says it is taking on a donation management role to support the community's needs.

The needs currently identified include generators, heaters, insulated sleeping mats, blankets and winter clothing. Last week, an Ontario nurses' group called on Ontario Premier Dalton McGuinty and Prime Minister Stephen Harper to intervene in the housing crisis on the James Bay reserve. The Registered Nurses' Association of Ontario called some of the living conditions in Attawapiskat deplorable and dangerous.



NDP candidate not pressing panic button


New Democratic Party leadership hopeful Robert Chisholm says there's no need for fellow New Democrats to panic that their record-high popularity seems to be eroding. He advises NDP members to take a deep breath and relax because there's plenty of time before the next election in 2015 to recoup lost ground.

As a former NDP leader in Nova Scotia, Chisholm says he's the only federal leadership contender who has experience trying to turn an unprecedented electoral breakthrough into lasting success. Under Mr. Chisholm's leadership, the Nova Scotia NDP went to a record 19 seats in 1998 from two. But the party dropped back to 11 seats 15 months later, hurt by a mid-campaign revelation that Chisholm hadn't been honest about a teenage drunk-driving conviction.





International

Somali fundamentalists ban aid groups


The Somali militant group al-Shabab on Monday banned 16 aid groups, including a half dozen U.N. agencies, from central and southern Somalia, a decision likely to harm Somalis already suffering from drought and famine.

The banning of the aid groups falls in line with the group's skeptical view of the outside world, but will worsen the suffering of the hundreds of thousands of Somalis who have come to depend on aid in the Horn of Africa country's worst famine since 1991-92. The al-Qaida-linked militant group's decision seemed to be rooted in the belief that aid groups are serving as spies for outside countries or as vehicles to undermine support for al-Shabab's harsh and strict interpretation of Islam.



Egyptian voters turn out en masse


Egyptians flocked to the polls on Monday for a first post-revolution election, making a mostly orderly start to their transition to democracy after a week of violence and political crisis. Ten months since the end of 30 years of autocratic rule by Hosni Mubarak, ousted by popular protests in one of the seminal events of the Arab Spring, up to 40 million voters are being asked to choose a new parliament. Voting for the lower house of parliament is taking place in three stages beginning in the main cities of Cairo, Alexandria and other areas, with the moderate Islamist group the Muslim Brotherhood expected to triumph. The highly complex procedure to elect a full assembly will end in March.



Syrians take to streets over Arab sanctions


Tens of thousands of Syrians protested on Monday in state-backed rallies against unprecedented economic sanctions imposed by the Arab League over President Bashar al-Assad's military crackdown on popular unrest. State television showed rallies "supporting national unity and rejecting foreign interference" in the capital Damascus and the second city of Aleppo. There were demonstrations also in the eastern cities of Deir al-Zor and Hasaka. The Arab League approved the sanctions against Syria on Sunday, the toughest imposed against a member state, isolating Assad's government over repression now in its ninth month.



Washington again presses on euro crisis


The United States said Monday that Europe needed to act "now" with force and decisiveness to attack the eurozone debt crisis, as President Barack Obama hosted a summit with top European officials. The U.S.-European summit at the White House came amid stark new warnings on the depths of the eurozone turmoil and renewed fears that the exposure to Europe of U.S. banks could rebound and harm the slow U.S. economic recovery.

Mr. Obama hosted European Council President Herman Van Rompuy, European Commission President Jose Manuel Barroso, High Representative Catherine Ashton and other officials for talks at the White House. The U.S. president has repeatedly stressed his anxiety over the eurozone crisis and halting efforts to fix it, and could pay a heavy price if economic panic vaults the Atlantic and slows the US recovery as he seeks re-election. A study by Fitch ratings agency published last week warned that exposure of the U.S. financial sector to European countries and banks was major.



Pakistan, NATO again at odds


Pakistan's military claimed Monday that the NATO airstrikes that killed 24 Pakistani soldiers lasted almost two hours and continued even after commanders at the bases pleaded with coalition forces to stop. NATO has described the incident as "tragic and unintended" and a mission on the Afghan side of the border and took incoming fire from the direction of the Pakistani posts. They responded with airstrikes.

Ties between Pakistan and the United States have sunk to new lows since the deadly attack, delivering a major setback to American hopes of enlisting Islamabad's help in negotiating an end to the 10-year-old Afghan war. An army spokesman the Pakistani troops at two border posts were the victims of unprovoked aggression. The Pakistan army has previously said its soldiers retaliated "with all weapons available" to the attack.



Britain regrets Iranian legislative move


Britain says it regrets an Iranian parliamentary bill demanding the expulsion of the British ambassador to Tehran. The office of Britain's Prime Minister David Cameron is said to be considering retaliatory steps it might take against Iran.

On Sunday, Iranian lawmakers voted to expel the British ambassador within two weeks and Iran's Guardians Council approved the move Monday making it law. Iran was responding to Britain's announcement last week that it was ceasing all contact between its financial system and that of Iran because of that country's nuclear activities.



Colombian drug kingpin caught


The presidents of Venezuela and Colombia announced Monday the capture of one of the region's most-wanted drug traffickers and hailed it as evidence of unity against crime between the ideologically opposed governments. Maximiliano Bonilla Orozco, a 39-year-old Colombian better known by his alias Valenciano, was captured in the Venezuelan city of Valencia late Sunday, the two leaders said at a meeting in Caracas.

Valenciano, with a $5 million bounty on his head, is accused of shipping tons of cocaine into the United States with the help of gangs like Mexico's Zetas. Though the conservative Mr. Santos is a key U.S. ally in the region and Venezuelan socialist leader Hugo Chavez is Washington's fiercest critic, the pair have overturned years of mistrust and forged a pragmatic, relationship since last year.





Financial

Cameco drops hostile takeover bid


Cameco Corp., the world's biggest uranium producer, has conceded defeat in a takeover struggle over a junior uranium miner in Saskatchewan. Cameco says it has abandoned its $625-million hostile offer for Hather Exploration Ltd. Hathor has accepted a $654-million bid from global mining giant Rio Tinto PLC. Hathor owns a doveted uranium deposit in northern Saskatchewan. The Athabasca Basin is one of the world's most productive uranium-mining areas.



Honda's parts shortage eases


Honda says it will increase production at its North American plants, including its major assembly operations in central Ontario, due to an improvement in the overall parts supply shortage caused by flooding in Thailand. The automaker says all of its North American plants, including Honda in Alliston will resume normal production by Dec. 1, this Thursday.

Most of the parts and materials used to produce Honda and Acura automobiles sold in Canada are purchased from North American suppliers. However, Honda says a few critical electronic parts are sourced from Thailand and other regions of the world. Honda cut output at its six North American factories by 50 per cent earlier this month due to the parts shortage.



Bombardier achieves breakthrough in India


Bombardier Transportation says it has sold propulsion systems to an Indian railway in a death worth US$214. The systems will be used to power regional trains operated by Mumbai Railway Vikas Corp. The equipment will be manufactured by Bombardier's Indian plant at Maneja and its facilities in Germany. This is the first time Bombardier has sold the propulsion equipment for commuter trains in India.



Markets


TSX on Monday: 11,640 + 178. Dollar: US.96. Euro: $1.37. Oil: $97.92 + $1.15.





Sports

Sports


FOOTBALL

Game Most Valuable Player Travis Lulay threw two second-half touchdown passes to lead B.C. to an exciting 34-23 Grey Cup win over the Winnipeg Blue Bombers on Sunday. The victory, before an ear-splitting B.C. Place sellout of 54,313, capped a stunning turnaround for the Lions, who opened the season 0-5.





Weather

Weather


British Columbia on Tuesday: rain south, snow north, high C6 Vancouver. Yukon, Northwest Territories: mix sun cloud. Nunavut: snow. Whitehorse -6, Yellowknife -26, Iqaluit -3. Alberta: snow north, cloud south. Saskatchewan, Manitoba: mix sun cloud. Edmonton 5, Regina 3, Winnipeg 0. Ontario: rain south, sun north. Quebec: rain. Toronto 9, Ottawa 5, Montreal 7. Maritimes: mix sun cloud. Newfoundland and Labrador: rain. Fredericton 8, Halifax 9, Charlottetown 6, St. John's 3.





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