Monday, October 31, 2011

Radio Prague Today 10.31.2011

Articles posted on www.radio.cz today

Sports News 31.10.2011

In Sports News: Czech tennis player Petra Kvitová caps best season with WTA Championship triumph; in football, Liberec & Viktoria Plzeň notch up victories while league leader Sparta slip; in the NHL, Montreal Canadiens Plekanec helps sink Bruins in their home-and-home series, while in the Extraliga Budějovice down Slavia.

President awards highest state honours

As is customary on the Day of Czechoslovak Independence, the Czech president awarded the highest honours of the land last week to doctors and scientists, soldiers and artists, political prisoners and everyday heroes. Many received the orders of the Czech Republic after tremendous travails, one after giving his own life.

Paul Day – owner of Prague's newly opened and much praised Asian fusion restaurant Sansho

Paul Day was born and raised in Stafford, in the UK's West Midlands, where he started working as a butcher, his first food industry job. After working in two Michelin-starred restaurants in London, the chef came to Prague and has recently opened a restaurant of his own, Sansho. In its first weeks of being open, the Asian fusion restaurant quickly became the one place everyone was talking about – and now, Sansho is fully booked most days – even at lunch. I met the chef at the restaurant, where he told me about the flavors that fascinate him, how Prague's dining scene differs from London's, and what first sparked his interest in food and cooking.

News 10.31.2011

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Copyright (c) 2011 Radio Prague (Cesky Rozhlas 7 - Radio Praha)

News Monday, October 31st, 2011

By: Daniela Lazarova

* The Czech Republic has criticized Monday's vote which granted the
Palestinians full membership in the United Nations' cultural agency
UNESCO.

* The Czech Finance Ministry has revised downward its growth forecast
for 2012.

* The army chief of staff has grounded the military's CASA planes after
one of the new transport aircraft suffered engine failure.

* The Czech Finance Ministry has rejected a massive 500-million-dollar
claim for unpaid bonds issued in 1924.

* Skoda Auto has nearly doubled its net profit from sales from January
to September.

========================================================================
Prague critical of Palestinian membership in UNESCO
------------------------------------------------------------------------

The Czech Republic has criticized Monday's vote which granted the
Palestinians full membership in the United Nations' cultural agency
UNESCO. Palestine was admitted as a UNESCO member by the votes of 107
member countries, while 14 countries, including the Czech Republic,
voted against the step and 52 abstained from the vote. Prague, which
lobbied in vain to try to get the EU to abstain from the vote, said the
move was ill-timed and would bring nothing positive for the Middle East
peace process. The vote is definitive and will take effect as soon as
Palestinian representatives sign the UNESCO Charter.


========================================================================
Ministry revised downward growth forecast
------------------------------------------------------------------------

The Czech Finance Ministry has revised downward its growth forecast for
2012, predicting a growth of 1 percent at best, down from a July
estimate of 2.5. This year's growth has been revised to 2.1 percent.
The Finance Ministry said the country's pro-export economy would be
affected by slower economic growth in Europe, especially its main
business partner Germany. A slowdown to 1.0 percent growth in 2012
would reduce state budget revenues by about 1.5 percent. The ministry
has said next year's budget will inevitably have to be revised and is
preparing several crisis scenarios including one for recession.


========================================================================
CASA planes grounded after engine failure
------------------------------------------------------------------------

The army's Chief of Staff Vlastimil Picek has grounded the military's
CASA planes after one of the new transport aircraft suffered engine
failure. The four planes will remain out of operation until the matter
has been investigated. The CASA planes which the army bought without a
public tender in 2009 have been dogged by problems. The 3.5 billion
crown deal was criticized as non-transparent and overpriced. The planes
have moreover failed to meet required norms and have not passed all
army tests.


========================================================================
Finance Ministry rejects claim for unpaid Karlovy Vary bonds
------------------------------------------------------------------------

The Czech Finance Ministry has rejected a massive 500-million-dollar
claim for unpaid bonds that the town of Karlovy Vary issued back in
1924. The bonds were sold in the United States and the claim was made
collectively by US lawyer Ed Fagan. Individual claimants have not been
identified. The spa town itself has rejected all responsibility saying
it was a different legal entity at the time, and the Czech Finance
Ministry which had been studying the case said the claims had been
statute barred for years. The bonds matured in 1954 but were never
paid. According to available information the Czechoslovak authorities
negotiated with the bond holders in 1984 and the two sides signed a
memorandum the contents of which have not been disclosed.


========================================================================
Witnesses admit construction problems may have caused Studenka accident
------------------------------------------------------------------------

A court in Ostrava on Monday heard the testimony of another witness in
the case of the tragic 2008 rail accident near Studenka when a
collapsing overpass then under construction hit a crowded international
express train killing eight people and injuring close to a hundred
others. The train travelling from the Polish city of Krakow to Prague
was carrying four hundred passengers. Several witnesses, including a
construction manager who took the stand on Monday, admitted that
construction problems and inadequate safety measures may have been
responsible for the accident.


========================================================================
Skoda Auto doubles net profit on higher sales
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Skoda Auto, the Czech unit of car maker Volkswagen AG, nearly doubled
its net profit in the January through September period to 471 million
euro from 237 million a year earlier on soaring global sales, a Skoda
spokesman said Monday. Skoda Auto's revenue rose 21% from the same
period a year earlier to 7.63 billion euro. The company's sales,
boosted by steadily growing demand for its cars in China, India and
Russia, rose 17% from the preceding year to 664,773 cars. The company
plans to continue adding two new vehicle models every year as it seeks
to double global sales to at least 1.5 million units by 2018.


========================================================================
Anonymous HIV tests free of charge
------------------------------------------------------------------------

The Czech asylum centre for AIDS patients Dum Svetla has announced it
is conducting anonymous HIV tests free of charge this week. The offer
which is made at least once a year is an effort to get more people in
high risk groups to undergo testing. The head of the Czech Society for
AIDS patients Miroslav Hlavaty has warned that Czechs generally
underestimate the risk of HIV infection and make very little effort to
protect themselves. Doctors have registered 114 new cases of HIV
infection this year bringing the overall number of cases registered
since testing began in 1986 to 1636. 335 people have since developed
full-blown AIDS, 176 have died.


========================================================================
Military police investigating death of solider
------------------------------------------------------------------------

The military police is investigating the death of a Czech soldier who
appears to have committed suicide. The 31-year-old was found dead on
the grounds of the military base where he served, shortly after
reporting for duty. He had been shot in the head from close range.


========================================================================
Hradcanska metro station closed after hoax call
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Prague's Hradcanska metro station was evacuated and closed to the
public an hour early on Sunday night after the police received an
anonymous warning about a planted explosive. A search revealed that the
phone call had been a hoax and the station opened to the public as
usual on Monday morning. Police are investigating the incident.


========================================================================
Road death toll decreasing
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Police statistics for October indicate that the death toll on Czech
roads has dropped to its lowest level in 20 years. Fifty-three people
died on the road this month, as compared to 85 in the same time-period
last year. Police attribute this to intensified road safety operations
throughout the year and a heightened police presence on the roads ahead
of All Souls Day when traffic tends to be particularly heavy.


========================================================================
Weather:
------------------------------------------------------------------------

The coming days should be cloudy to overcast with scattered showers and
day temperatures around 12 Celsius.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Articles posted on www.radio.cz today
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Sports News 31.10.2011
------------------------------------------------------------------------

In Sports News: Czech tennis player Petra Kvitova caps best season with
WTA Championship triumph; in football, Liberec & Viktoria Plzen notch
up victories while league leader Sparta slip; in the NHL, Montreal
Canadiens Plekanec helps sink Bruins in their home-and-home series,
while in the Extraliga Budejovice down Slavia.

http://www.radio.cz/en/section/sport/sports-news-2011-10-31


President awards highest state honours
------------------------------------------------------------------------

As is customary on the Day of Czechoslovak Independence, the Czech
president awarded the highest honours of the land last week to doctors
and scientists, soldiers and artists, political prisoners and everyday
heroes. Many received the orders of the Czech Republic after tremendous
travails, one after giving his own life.

http://www.radio.cz/en/section/curraffrs/president-awards-highest-state-honours


Paul Day - owner of Prague's newly opened and much praised Asian fusion
restaurant Sansho
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Paul Day was born and raised in Stafford, in the UK's West Midlands,
where he started working as a butcher, his first food industry job.
After working in two Michelin-starred restaurants in London, the chef
came to Prague and has recently opened a restaurant of his own, Sansho.
In its first weeks of being open, the Asian fusion restaurant quickly
became the one place everyone was talking about - and now, Sansho is
fully booked most days - even at lunch. I met the chef at the
restaurant, where he told me about the flavors that fascinate him, how
Prague's dining scene differs from London's, and what first sparked his
interest in food and cooking.

http://www.radio.cz/en/section/one-on-one/paul-day-owner-of-pragues-newly-opened-and-much-praised-asian-fusion-restaurant-sansho-1


------------------------------------------------------------------------
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NEWS /www.nrcu.gov.ua/

Dear subscriber!

We offer you most recent news by this moment on air at National radio company of
Ukraine. To read these news items in full, please, refer to our site
www.nrcu.gov.ua.

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2011-10-31 16:08:00
President hopes for successful completion of talks on association agreement at
Ukraine-EU summit in December.
Viktor Yanukovych announced this while congratulating President of the European
Council Herman Van Rompuy on his birthday.
http://www.nrcu.gov.ua/index.php?id=148&listid=155900

2011-10-31 15:43:00
Association of Ukrainians in Transnistria celebrates its 20th anniversary.
The ceremonial events started at the Tiraspol Taras Shevchenko State University
with the scientific conference dubbed "Union of Ukrainians in Transnistria - 20
years on the path to rebirth and creation.".
http://www.nrcu.gov.ua/index.php?id=148&listid=155926

2011-10-31 15:32:00
Exhibition of folk toys held in Kyiv.
Folk art exhibition is under way at the Ukrainian culture and art center in Kyiv
that is dubbed "Dreams Mary" and "Fragrant Fairy tale".
http://www.nrcu.gov.ua/index.php?id=148&listid=155924

2011-10-31 15:13:00
Doctors advise soon be vaccinated against measles.
They say next year it will be peak of its spreading. According to them, measles
is a disease with a long cycle and next wave of its incidence coincides in time
with the Euro 2012 holding.
http://www.nrcu.gov.ua/index.php?id=148&listid=155923

2011-10-31 14:53:00
Ukrainian companies to be recompensed for refusal of geographical names.
This was disclosed by Ukrainian Government's Commissioner for European
Integration Valeriy Piatnytsky who said that one of the most discussed issues at
the free trade area negotiations with the EU was the use of geographicalnames.
http://www.nrcu.gov.ua/index.php?id=148&listid=155919

2011-10-31 14:46:00
Park laid in Krasny Liman Donetsk region.
The park's collection includes trees and shrubs of over two hundred different
species, from pine, white acacia - to barberry and other species.
http://www.nrcu.gov.ua/index.php?id=148&listid=155915

2011-10-31 14:27:00
Occupations somehow related to agriculture to be in demand in Ukraine in next 10
years.
This is what domestic employment agencies state.First, the demand will be for
agronomists, zooengineer, technical experts in agroindustrial comlpex as well as
specialists in biotechnology.
http://www.nrcu.gov.ua/index.php?id=148&listid=155914

2011-10-31 14:18:00
Ukraine seeks to agree with IMFacceptable terms to receive regular loan.
This was stressed by the Prime Minister. In Kiev, the next round of negotiations
with the IMF mission will be held. Previously the Head of Government said that
the country hopes for agreement in talks with the Fund on the issue of revision
of gas prices forhouseholds.
http://www.nrcu.gov.ua/index.php?id=148&listid=155910

2011-10-31 13:49:00
Cabinet approves new standards for elementary school.
School programs have been already worked out. A competion for preparing school
text-books has been announced.This was reported in the Ministry of Education.
http://www.nrcu.gov.ua/index.php?id=148&listid=155907

2011-10-31 13:33:00
Construction of "Lviv Arena" stadium fully financed from state budget.
This was disclosed by Vice-Premier, Minister of Infrastructure of Ukraine Borys
Kolesnikov.
http://www.nrcu.gov.ua/index.php?id=148&listid=155904


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RCI Cyberjournal

Edition 30 October 2011
Canadian International Sports Weather
Canadian

Harper pleased with Commonwealth Summit results


Prime Minister Stephen Harper and other Commonwealth leaders wrapped up their meeting in Perth, Australia on Sunday, agreeing to develop "one clear, powerful statement" of values for the 54 member countries. A But the Commonwealth leaders failed to act on two-thirds of recommended reforms. One was an urgent appeal for a new Commonwealth human rights commissioner to investigate abuses, while another called for the repeal of laws against homosexuality in a majority of Commonwealth countries. Sri Lanka, whose army has been accused of war crimes during the civil war with the Tamil Tigers, is due to host the next summit. Mr. Harper has said he will boycott the meeting unless there are major reforms in Sri Lanka. Mr. Harper expressed frustration with the slow movement by member nations to accept two-thirds of recommended reforms, but he said overall he was pleased with what was achieved. Mr. Harper suggested the group had made progress in boosting human rights in non-Commonwealth countries with bad records in that area.



Former general warns latest death should not stop Afghan mission


A senior military observer says Canada's training mission in Afghanistan should not be derailed by the death of a Canadian soldier in a suicide bombing on Saturday. Master Corporal Byron Greff and 16 others were killed in Kabul when a suicide bomber rammed his vehicle into an armoured NATO bus. Retired Canadian major-general Lewis MacKenzie says some critics of Canada's involvement in Afghanistan might use Cpl. Greff's death to support their arguments for a complete pullout. But Gen. MacKenzie said it's important to put things into perspective. While acknowledging that even one death is too many, Gen. MacKenzie noted the number of Canadian soldiers killed in Afghanistan this year is way down from previous years. Speaking after the Commonwealth Summit in Australia Sunday, Prime Minister Harper said there's no way Canadian military personnel can work in Afghanistan without significant risks. Cpl. Greff was among the 920 Canadian soldiers who are training Afghan military personnel in the country until 2014 following thewithdrawal of Canadian combat troops earlier this year. His death brought to 158 the number of Canadian Forces personnel killed in Afghanistan since Canada first sent troops there as part of the NATO force in early 2002.



Harper speaks of Gadhafi's demise


Prime Minister Harper says he takes no great pleasure in the brutal execution of deposed Libyan dictator Moammar Gadhafi but adds that realistically, such an end should have been expected. As the no-fly zone over Libya is lifted and Canada's military mission there ends, cell phone videos of Gadhafi's final minutes have called into question the emerging new country's commitment to the rule of law. Ghastly details have emerged from triumphal videos showing a frenzied pack of rebels savagely beating Gadhafi and apparently sodomizing him with a knife before he was shot dead. Mr. Harper was asked about the horrific spectacle following a Commonwealth summit in Perth, Australia, that focused heavily on human rights and rule of law. He said that after 42 years of what he called "psychotic dictatorship" in Libya, he was realistic enough to know the chances of Gadhafi meeting such an end were "pretty high." Mr. Harper said Libya is going to be "a work in progress going forward," but that too is be expected since the country had no institutions of civil society or democratic governance.



Canadian veteran plans hunger strike


A veteran of Canada's military mission in Bosnia in the 1990s plans to go on a hunger strike this week but says he may be dead by Remembrance Day on November the ninth. Thirty-eight-year-old Pascal Lacoste believes he was poisoned due to exposure to depleted uranium in Bosnia. He plans to protest outside the Quebec office of the Department of Veterans Affairs that he says has repeatedly refused to pay for toxicology tests and costly decontamination treatments.



Residents gather to mourn car crash victims


A public memorial service was held Sunday in a northern Alberta arena for four high school football players. The teens from Grande Prairie were killed last weekend when police say a pickup truck slammed into their car. A fifth teen remains in hospital in critical condition. Sunday's service follows a dramatic win Saturday by the boys' team, the Warriors. They routed the Sexsmith Sabres 40-0 ina Mighty Peace Football League semi-final game, advancing to their league's championship. Coach Rick Gilson said it was particularly emotional during the moment of silence before the start of the game, but he said the team remained focused after the kickoff. Twenty-one-year-old Brenden Holubowich faces various charges in connection with the crash, including drunk driving causing death and leaving the scene of an accident. The suspect is due to appear in court again on Monday to face the allegations against him.



Chisholm joins NDP leadership race


MP Robert Chisholm touted his experience as former leader of the NDP in Nova Scotia Sunday as he announced he'll be the eighth candidate running to lead the party at the federal level. Premier Darrell Dexter and a group of provincial cabinet ministers attended the announcement at a Halifax restaurant to show their support for the MP for Dartmouth-Cole Habour. Mr. Chisholm acknowledged in his campaign launch that he's an underdog in the race to succeed former leader Jack Layton. He quoted his former leader saying, "Don't let them tell you it can't be done." Mr. Chisholm led the NDP to a breakthrough in Nova Scotia's 1998 election, when the party won 19 seats in the legislature and achieved opposition status. The unilingual candidate says he's started taking French courses and expects to learn the language, however he was only able to speak a few words of French in response to reporters' questions.



Saudi religious police beat and arrest Canadian iman


Eyewitnesses and a human rights group say a prominent Canadian imam has been beaten, arrested and falsely charged while on a pilgrimage in Saudi Arabia. They say Usama al-Atar was leading a prayer recitation in Medina Sunday when 10 to 15 members of the country's religious police asked the small group to move along. Mohamed Hayward, a UK citizen who was part of the group, says the religious police then harassed the compliant pilgrims and zeroed in on Mr. al-Atar. Mr. Hayward said officials "virtually strangled" the imam, even though the Edmonton resident didn't put up a fight. Mr. Hayward said the 33-year-old Canadian is now "languishing in a jail" and is expected to appear in court Monday morning to face unclear charges. Mr. Hayward said Mr. al-Atar, who is a researcher at the University of Alberta, has an elderly father, a pregnant wife and a three year-old-child in Canada.

 



C-SIS warned of hacking threat


Canada's spy agency warned the government that federal departments were under assault from rogue hackers just weeks before an attack crippled key computers. A newly released intelligence assessment, prepared last November, sounded a security alarm about malicious, targeted emails disguised as legitimate messages -- the very kind that shut down networks two months later. A declassified copy of the top secret intelligence assessment, "Cyberattacks on Canadian Government Departments: An Overview," was obtained by The Canadian Press under the Access to Information Act. Extensive portions of the Nov. 4, 2010, report -- including what are likely direct references to foreign suspects -- have been excised due to ongoing sensitivity of the material. Employee Internet access at the Treasury Board and Finance departments was cut off in January after what officials said was an unauthorized attempt to break into the networks. A routine evaluation of both departments last year revealed they had not been following all of the government's information technology security requirements.



Atlantic Canada in for early snowstorm


A major snowstorm that has blanketed parts of the US East Coast was moving into Atlantic Canada on Sunday. Environment Canada issued various snowfall, rain and wind warnings for parts of New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island. The storm swept up the US East Coast Saturday, knocking out power to more than 2.3 million customers ins states from Maryland to Maine, causing flight cancellations and delays.



Panel looking at ways to save West Coast killer whales


Canadian and US experts are looking at whether limiting the salmon fishery would help save killer whales plying West Coast waters. A scientific panel has been asked to determine if salmon fisheries need to be restricted in order to give the endangered whales a larger share of the coveted chinook salmon run. Several studies show that southern resident killer whales prefer the chinook, many of which are bound for BC's Fraser River, and that a bad year for the salmon correlates with poor survival rates for the whales. Lynne Barre, a marine biologist with the US fisheries department, says it's too early to say if the panel's findings will mean limiting West Coast salmon fishing. But she says preliminary findings linking the salmon and the whales indicates there is certainly reason for concern. The panel's report is due at the end of 2012. Only 88 southern resident killer whales have been counted in three family pods off the Pacific Coast.



Official says flood-prone reserve must move to higher ground


A flood liaison official appointed by the federal Aboriginal Affairs minister says a chronically flooded native reserve in Manitoba must be permanently moved to higher ground. Sid Dutchak says it's going to take time to relocate the Lake St. Martin reserve, but there is no point in rebuilding some parts of the community. He says flooding has destroyed homes and many others are threatened by ice this winter. Manitoba Aboriginal Affairs Minister Eric Robinson says the reserve should have been moved in the 1960s and Ottawa isn't moving fast enough to do it now. Residents of the northern reserve were evacuated from their homes in the spring and have been unable to return since.





International

Syria


President Bashar al-Assad has warned of an "earthquake" if the West intervenes in his country. In a rare interview with a British newspaper, he said such involvement risked transforming Syria into another Afghanistan. At least 50 civilians and members of the security forces were killed during anti-government demonstrations on Saturday. Activists said 21 civilians were killed and that army tanks had shelled a historic district in the city of Homs. The government said 20 soldiers had been killed in Homs, and 10 members of the security forces killed during an ambush of their bus in Idlib province. More than 3,000 people have died in the unrest since protests calling for the government of Mr. Assad to step down broke out in March.



Middle East


A Palestinian militant group said Sunday one of its fighters had been killed and another wounded in an Israeli airstrike. The Democratic Front for the Liberation of Palestine, a small militant group, said the men were members of their organization. The Hamas militant group's Health Ministry said the strike occurred along Gaza's border with Israel on Sunday afternoon. The Israeli military confirmed the airstrike but gave no other details. After a weekend of violence, Sunday had been largely quiet following a cease-fire offer from Palestinian militants. The airstrike raised the likelihood that fresh fighting would erupt.



Pakistan


Intelligence officials said Sunday suspected US unmanned aircraft fired six missiles at a vehicle near the Afghan border, killing six alleged militants. The officials said Sunday's attack occurred in the Datta Khel area of the North Waziristan tribal region. A house was also partly destroyed. The identities of the suspected militants killed in the strike were unknown.



UK


The Foreign Office said Sunday two British civilians working for a building contractor were among the victims of Saturday's suicide bombing of a NATO convoy in Kabul that killed 17 people, including a Canadian soldier. A Taliban suicide bomber rammed a vehicle loaded with explosives into an armoured NATO bus on a busy thoroughfare in Kabul, killing five NATO service members, including eight civilian contractors, and four Afghans.



Turkey


Workers on Sunday started razing damaged buildings and clearing the debris of collapsed ones a week after a massive earthquake killed at least 582 people. Early Sunday, a 5.3-magnitude aftershock caused panic in the quake zone in eastern Van province, where thousands of survivors spent the night in tents. An Associated Press photographer witnessed people screaming in panic as the aftershock jolted apartment buildings in the city of Van.



Thailand


Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra is expressing optimism that the country's worst flooding in a half-century will mostly spare Bangkok. Some neighbourhood dikes have overflowed, but the city's defences otherwise have held firm during a weekend of critical high tides. City dikes overflowed in at least two places as coastal high tides pushed up the main Chao Praya river from the Gulf of Thailand, with water spilling into streets as city workers and troops shored up concrete walls with sandbags. Ms. Shinawatra urged Bangkok residents to be "confident," saying Sunday that there may be some overflow into some neighbourhoods but that it would not cause any great damage.



Kyrgyzstan


Moderate Prime Minister Almazbek Atambayev on Sunday took a commanding lead in the volatile Central Asian state's first presidential poll since a revolution and deadly ethnic bloodletting last year. Mr. Almazbek is hoping to win outright in the first round to avoid a potentially tight second round run-off against one of the two Kyrgyz nationalist challengers who could trouble the West if they won. A successful election would make the strategic nation -- the only one to house both a Russian and US military base -- the first in authoritarian Central Asian to secure a peaceful transition of power since the USSR's collapse. The central election commission said Mr. Atambayev had 65 percent of the vote with about a third of the precincts reporting on turnout that was expected to exceed 60 percent. His two nationalist rivals were at about 14 percent each.



Burma/Myanmar


Democracy movement leader Aung San Suu Kyi met Sunday with a Cabinet minister to discuss issues whose resolution could lead to a breakthrough in the country's long-running political deadlock. After meeting Ms. Suu Kyi, Labour Minister Aung Kyi read a joint statement that said the two had discussed an amnesty, peace talks with ethnic armed groups and economic and financial matters. Some 200 of an estimated 2,000 political prisoners were released on Oct. 11 under an amnesty for 6,300 convicts. An elected but military-backed government took power in March after decades of repressive army rule and President Thein Sein has moved to liberalize the political atmosphere.



Australia


The Commonwealth Summit in Perth ended Sunday with leaders procrastinating on two-thirds of recommended reforms. One was an urgent appeal for a new Commonwealth human rights commissioner to investigate abuses, while another called for the repeal of laws against homosexuality in a majority of Commonwealth countries. Canadian Prime Minister Harper said he was frustrated with the slow movement but said he was still pleased with what was achieved. Mr. Harper suggested the group has made progress in boosting human rights in non-Commonwealth countries with bad records in that area.



China


Rights activists have criticized a Hollywood studio for filming a buddy comedy in an eastern Chinese city where a blind, self-taught activist lawyer is being held under house arrest and reportedly beaten. Relativity Media is shooting part of the comedy "21 and Over" in Linyi, a city in Shandong province where the activist Chen Guangcheng is being confined in his house, surrounded by police and thugs. A studio press release touted its close relationship with local government officials.



Denmark


Axel Axgil, whose struggle for gay rights helped make Denmark the first country to legalize same-sex partnerships, has died. He was 96. Danish gay rights group LGBT Danmark says Axgil died in a hospital in Copenhagen on Saturday following complications from a fall. Axgil, born Axel Lundahl-Madsen, was among the founders of the group in 1948. On Oct. 1, 1989, he and his partner, Eigil, were among 11 couples who exchanged vows as Denmark became the first country to allow gays to enter civil unions. Eigil Axgil died in 1995. The men melded their first names into a new surname, Axgil, and used it in a public show of defiance. In the 1950s, both were sentenced to short prison terms on pornography charges for running a gay modeling agency.





Sports

Sunday sports roundup


PAN AMERICAN GAMES

Gold medal boxer Mary Spencer was set to carry Canada's flag at the closing ceremony of the Pan American Games in Guadalajara, Mexico on Sunday. Spencer is a three-time world champion and won a gold medal at the Games in the women's 75-kilogram boxing event. Christine Sinclair, the captain of Canada's gold-medal winning women's soccer team, was the flag bearer for the opening ceremony on Oct. 14. Toronto will host the next games in 2015. On Saturday, Mandy Bujold won gold in women's 51-kg boxing. In the canoe/kayak competiton, Richard Dalton won gold in the C1, 200m event and Ryan Cochrane and Hugues Fournel won the K2, 200m final. In women's diving, Jennifer Abel and Emilie Heymans won the silver in the women's 3m sychronized springboard final. In fencing, Canada won silver in the men's team sabre final and Canada's women's team won silver in epee final. Canada's men's field hockey team was unable to lock up an Olympic berth, dropping a 3-1 decision to Argentina in the gold-medal match, winning the silver. In men's water polo, Canada lost to the US 7-3 in the final, winning the silver medal. Entering Sunday's competition, Canadian athletes had won a total of 118 medals. (29 gold, 40 silver and 49 bronze). That was good for fifth place in the medal standings, behing the US, Brazil, Cuba and Mexico. In the 2007 Games in Rio de Janeiro, Canada won 137 medals (39 gold, 43 silver, 55 bronze), finishing behind the US and Brazil

NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE

Saturday's results: Montreal defeated Boston 4-2, Ottawa defeated the New York Rangers 5-4 in a shootout, Toronto defeated Pittsburgh 4-3, Tampa Bay shut out Winnipeg 1-0 and Vancouver defeated Washington 7-4.

CANADIAN FOOTBALL LEAGUE

Sunday's result: Calgary defeated Montreal 32-27. On Saturday, Saskatchewan defeated Hamilton 19-3 and BC defeated Edmonton 29-20.

FIGURE SKATING

Canadian Patrick Chan began the defence of his world championship with a come-from-behind win in the men's event at Skate Canada in Mississauga, ON on Saturday. Chan was third after the men's short program Friday, but his free skate program was good enough, even with a fall and a stumble. Fourteen-year-old Elizaveta Tuktamisheva of Russia won the women's title. She's the youngest gold medallist since Canada's Tracey Wainman won at age 13 in 1981.

MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL

Canadian right-hander Ryan Dempster, who was 10-14 last season, has exercised his $14 million US player option and will return to the Chicago Cubs in 2012.





Weather

Monday's forecasts


Vancouver has a mix of sun and cloud with a forecast high temperature of 11 degrees Celsius. Calgary is cloudy with a high of six, Regina is sunny, a high of eight. Winnipeg is sunny, a high of nine. Toronto is cloudy with a chance of showers, a high of nine. Ottawa has a mix of sun and cloud, a high of eight. Montreal is sunny, a high of nine. Fredericton is sunny, a high of seven. Charlottetown has a mix of sun and cloud, a high of six. Halifax is sunny, a high of five. St. John's has periods of rain or snow, a high of three. Whitehorse and Yellowknife are cloudy with a chance of flurries, highs of zero. Iqaluit is cloudy, a high of minus-seven.





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RCI Cyberjournal

Harper pleased with Commonwealth Summit results


Prime Minister Stephen Harper and other Commonwealth leaders wrapped up their meeting in Perth, Australia on Sunday, agreeing to develop "one clear, powerful statement" of values for the 54 member countries. A But the Commonwealth leaders failed to act on two-thirds of recommended reforms. One was an urgent appeal for a new Commonwealth human rights commissioner to investigate abuses, while another called for the repeal of laws against homosexuality in a majority of Commonwealth countries. Sri Lanka, whose army has been accused of war crimes during the civil war with the Tamil Tigers, is due to host the next summit. Mr. Harper has said he will boycott the meeting unless there are major reforms in Sri Lanka. Mr. Harper expressed frustration with the slow movement by member nations to accept two-thirds of recommended reforms, but he said overall he was pleased with what was achieved. Mr. Harper suggested the group had made progress in boosting human rights in non-Commonwealth countries with bad records in that area.

Former general warns latest death should not stop Afghan mission


A senior military observer says Canada's training mission in Afghanistan should not be derailed by the death of a Canadian soldier in a suicide bombing on Saturday. Master Corporal Byron Greff and 16 others were killed in Kabul when a suicide bomber rammed his vehicle into an armoured NATO bus. Retired Canadian major-general Lewis MacKenzie says some critics of Canada's involvement in Afghanistan might use Cpl. Greff's death to support their arguments for a complete pullout. But Gen. MacKenzie said it's important to put things into perspective. While acknowledging that even one death is too many, Gen. MacKenzie noted the number of Canadian soldiers killed in Afghanistan this year is way down from previous years. Speaking after the Commonwealth Summit in Australia Sunday, Prime Minister Harper said there's no way Canadian military personnel can work in Afghanistan without significant risks. Cpl. Greff was among the 920 Canadian soldiers who are training Afghan military personnel in the country until 2014 following thewithdrawal of Canadian combat troops earlier this year. His death brought to 158 the number of Canadian Forces personnel killed in Afghanistan since Canada first sent troops there as part of the NATO force in early 2002.

Harper speaks of Gadhafi's demise


Prime Minister Harper says he takes no great pleasure in the brutal execution of deposed Libyan dictator Moammar Gadhafi but adds that realistically, such an end should have been expected. As the no-fly zone over Libya is lifted and Canada's military mission there ends, cell phone videos of Gadhafi's final minutes have called into question the emerging new country's commitment to the rule of law. Ghastly details have emerged from triumphal videos showing a frenzied pack of rebels savagely beating Gadhafi and apparently sodomizing him with a knife before he was shot dead. Mr. Harper was asked about the horrific spectacle following a Commonwealth summit in Perth, Australia, that focused heavily on human rights and rule of law. He said that after 42 years of what he called "psychotic dictatorship" in Libya, he was realistic enough to know the chances of Gadhafi meeting such an end were "pretty high." Mr. Harper said Libya is going to be "a work in progress going forward," but that too is be expected since the country had no institutions of civil society or democratic governance.

Canadian veteran plans hunger strike


A veteran of Canada's military mission in Bosnia in the 1990s plans to go on a hunger strike this week but says he may be dead by Remembrance Day on November the ninth. Thirty-eight-year-old Pascal Lacoste believes he was poisoned due to exposure to depleted uranium in Bosnia. He plans to protest outside the Quebec office of the Department of Veterans Affairs that he says has repeatedly refused to pay for toxicology tests and costly decontamination treatments.

Residents gather to mourn car crash victims


A public memorial service was held Sunday in a northern Alberta arena for four high school football players. The teens from Grande Prairie were killed last weekend when police say a pickup truck slammed into their car. A fifth teen remains in hospital in critical condition. Sunday's service follows a dramatic win Saturday by the boys' team, the Warriors. They routed the Sexsmith Sabres 40-0 ina Mighty Peace Football League semi-final game, advancing to their league's championship. Coach Rick Gilson said it was particularly emotional during the moment of silence before the start of the game, but he said the team remained focused after the kickoff. Twenty-one-year-old Brenden Holubowich faces various charges in connection with the crash, including drunk driving causing death and leaving the scene of an accident. The suspect is due to appear in court again on Monday to face the allegations against him.

Chisholm joins NDP leadership race


MP Robert Chisholm touted his experience as former leader of the NDP in Nova Scotia Sunday as he announced he'll be the eighth candidate running to lead the party at the federal level. Premier Darrell Dexter and a group of provincial cabinet ministers attended the announcement at a Halifax restaurant to show their support for the MP for Dartmouth-Cole Habour. Mr. Chisholm acknowledged in his campaign launch that he's an underdog in the race to succeed former leader Jack Layton. He quoted his former leader saying, "Don't let them tell you it can't be done." Mr. Chisholm led the NDP to a breakthrough in Nova Scotia's 1998 election, when the party won 19 seats in the legislature and achieved opposition status. The unilingual candidate says he's started taking French courses and expects to learn the language, however he was only able to speak a few words of French in response to reporters' questions.

Saudi religious police beat and arrest Canadian iman


Eyewitnesses and a human rights group say a prominent Canadian imam has been beaten, arrested and falsely charged while on a pilgrimage in Saudi Arabia. They say Usama al-Atar was leading a prayer recitation in Medina Sunday when 10 to 15 members of the country's religious police asked the small group to move along. Mohamed Hayward, a UK citizen who was part of the group, says the religious police then harassed the compliant pilgrims and zeroed in on Mr. al-Atar. Mr. Hayward said officials "virtually strangled" the imam, even though the Edmonton resident didn't put up a fight. Mr. Hayward said the 33-year-old Canadian is now "languishing in a jail" and is expected to appear in court Monday morning to face unclear charges. Mr. Hayward said Mr. al-Atar, who is a researcher at the University of Alberta, has an elderly father, a pregnant wife and a three year-old-child in Canada.

 

C-SIS warned of hacking threat


Canada's spy agency warned the government that federal departments were under assault from rogue hackers just weeks before an attack crippled key computers. A newly released intelligence assessment, prepared last November, sounded a security alarm about malicious, targeted emails disguised as legitimate messages -- the very kind that shut down networks two months later. A declassified copy of the top secret intelligence assessment, "Cyberattacks on Canadian Government Departments: An Overview," was obtained by The Canadian Press under the Access to Information Act. Extensive portions of the Nov. 4, 2010, report -- including what are likely direct references to foreign suspects -- have been excised due to ongoing sensitivity of the material. Employee Internet access at the Treasury Board and Finance departments was cut off in January after what officials said was an unauthorized attempt to break into the networks. A routine evaluation of both departments last year revealed they had not been following all of the government's information technology security requirements.

Atlantic Canada in for early snowstorm


A major snowstorm that has blanketed parts of the US East Coast was moving into Atlantic Canada on Sunday. Environment Canada issued various snowfall, rain and wind warnings for parts of New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island. The storm swept up the US East Coast Saturday, knocking out power to more than 2.3 million customers ins states from Maryland to Maine, causing flight cancellations and delays.

Panel looking at ways to save West Coast killer whales


Canadian and US experts are looking at whether limiting the salmon fishery would help save killer whales plying West Coast waters. A scientific panel has been asked to determine if salmon fisheries need to be restricted in order to give the endangered whales a larger share of the coveted chinook salmon run. Several studies show that southern resident killer whales prefer the chinook, many of which are bound for BC's Fraser River, and that a bad year for the salmon correlates with poor survival rates for the whales. Lynne Barre, a marine biologist with the US fisheries department, says it's too early to say if the panel's findings will mean limiting West Coast salmon fishing. But she says preliminary findings linking the salmon and the whales indicates there is certainly reason for concern. The panel's report is due at the end of 2012. Only 88 southern resident killer whales have been counted in three family pods off the Pacific Coast.

Official says flood-prone reserve must move to higher ground


A flood liaison official appointed by the federal Aboriginal Affairs minister says a chronically flooded native reserve in Manitoba must be permanently moved to higher ground. Sid Dutchak says it's going to take time to relocate the Lake St. Martin reserve, but there is no point in rebuilding some parts of the community. He says flooding has destroyed homes and many others are threatened by ice this winter. Manitoba Aboriginal Affairs Minister Eric Robinson says the reserve should have been moved in the 1960s and Ottawa isn't moving fast enough to do it now. Residents of the northern reserve were evacuated from their homes in the spring and have been unable to return since.


Syria


President Bashar al-Assad has warned of an "earthquake" if the West intervenes in his country. In a rare interview with a British newspaper, he said such involvement risked transforming Syria into another Afghanistan. At least 50 civilians and members of the security forces were killed during anti-government demonstrations on Saturday. Activists said 21 civilians were killed and that army tanks had shelled a historic district in the city of Homs. The government said 20 soldiers had been killed in Homs, and 10 members of the security forces killed during an ambush of their bus in Idlib province. More than 3,000 people have died in the unrest since protests calling for the government of Mr. Assad to step down broke out in March.

Middle East


A Palestinian militant group said Sunday one of its fighters had been killed and another wounded in an Israeli airstrike. The Democratic Front for the Liberation of Palestine, a small militant group, said the men were members of their organization. The Hamas militant group's Health Ministry said the strike occurred along Gaza's border with Israel on Sunday afternoon. The Israeli military confirmed the airstrike but gave no other details. After a weekend of violence, Sunday had been largely quiet following a cease-fire offer from Palestinian militants. The airstrike raised the likelihood that fresh fighting would erupt.

Pakistan


Intelligence officials said Sunday suspected US unmanned aircraft fired six missiles at a vehicle near the Afghan border, killing six alleged militants. The officials said Sunday's attack occurred in the Datta Khel area of the North Waziristan tribal region. A house was also partly destroyed. The identities of the suspected militants killed in the strike were unknown.

UK


The Foreign Office said Sunday two British civilians working for a building contractor were among the victims of Saturday's suicide bombing of a NATO convoy in Kabul that killed 17 people, including a Canadian soldier. A Taliban suicide bomber rammed a vehicle loaded with explosives into an armoured NATO bus on a busy thoroughfare in Kabul, killing five NATO service members, including eight civilian contractors, and four Afghans.

Turkey


Workers on Sunday started razing damaged buildings and clearing the debris of collapsed ones a week after a massive earthquake killed at least 582 people. Early Sunday, a 5.3-magnitude aftershock caused panic in the quake zone in eastern Van province, where thousands of survivors spent the night in tents. An Associated Press photographer witnessed people screaming in panic as the aftershock jolted apartment buildings in the city of Van.

Thailand


Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra is expressing optimism that the country's worst flooding in a half-century will mostly spare Bangkok. Some neighbourhood dikes have overflowed, but the city's defences otherwise have held firm during a weekend of critical high tides. City dikes overflowed in at least two places as coastal high tides pushed up the main Chao Praya river from the Gulf of Thailand, with water spilling into streets as city workers and troops shored up concrete walls with sandbags. Ms. Shinawatra urged Bangkok residents to be "confident," saying Sunday that there may be some overflow into some neighbourhoods but that it would not cause any great damage.

Kyrgyzstan


Moderate Prime Minister Almazbek Atambayev on Sunday took a commanding lead in the volatile Central Asian state's first presidential poll since a revolution and deadly ethnic bloodletting last year. Mr. Almazbek is hoping to win outright in the first round to avoid a potentially tight second round run-off against one of the two Kyrgyz nationalist challengers who could trouble the West if they won. A successful election would make the strategic nation -- the only one to house both a Russian and US military base -- the first in authoritarian Central Asian to secure a peaceful transition of power since the USSR's collapse. The central election commission said Mr. Atambayev had 65 percent of the vote with about a third of the precincts reporting on turnout that was expected to exceed 60 percent. His two nationalist rivals were at about 14 percent each.

Burma/Myanmar


Democracy movement leader Aung San Suu Kyi met Sunday with a Cabinet minister to discuss issues whose resolution could lead to a breakthrough in the country's long-running political deadlock. After meeting Ms. Suu Kyi, Labour Minister Aung Kyi read a joint statement that said the two had discussed an amnesty, peace talks with ethnic armed groups and economic and financial matters. Some 200 of an estimated 2,000 political prisoners were released on Oct. 11 under an amnesty for 6,300 convicts. An elected but military-backed government took power in March after decades of repressive army rule and President Thein Sein has moved to liberalize the political atmosphere.

Australia


The Commonwealth Summit in Perth ended Sunday with leaders procrastinating on two-thirds of recommended reforms. One was an urgent appeal for a new Commonwealth human rights commissioner to investigate abuses, while another called for the repeal of laws against homosexuality in a majority of Commonwealth countries. Canadian Prime Minister Harper said he was frustrated with the slow movement but said he was still pleased with what was achieved. Mr. Harper suggested the group has made progress in boosting human rights in non-Commonwealth countries with bad records in that area.

China


Rights activists have criticized a Hollywood studio for filming a buddy comedy in an eastern Chinese city where a blind, self-taught activist lawyer is being held under house arrest and reportedly beaten. Relativity Media is shooting part of the comedy "21 and Over" in Linyi, a city in Shandong province where the activist Chen Guangcheng is being confined in his house, surrounded by police and thugs. A studio press release touted its close relationship with local government officials.

Denmark


Axel Axgil, whose struggle for gay rights helped make Denmark the first country to legalize same-sex partnerships, has died. He was 96. Danish gay rights group LGBT Danmark says Axgil died in a hospital in Copenhagen on Saturday following complications from a fall. Axgil, born Axel Lundahl-Madsen, was among the founders of the group in 1948. On Oct. 1, 1989, he and his partner, Eigil, were among 11 couples who exchanged vows as Denmark became the first country to allow gays to enter civil unions. Eigil Axgil died in 1995. The men melded their first names into a new surname, Axgil, and used it in a public show of defiance. In the 1950s, both were sentenced to short prison terms on pornography charges for running a gay modeling agency.


Sunday sports roundup


PAN AMERICAN GAMES

Gold medal boxer Mary Spencer was set to carry Canada's flag at the closing ceremony of the Pan American Games in Guadalajara, Mexico on Sunday. Spencer is a three-time world champion and won a gold medal at the Games in the women's 75-kilogram boxing event. Christine Sinclair, the captain of Canada's gold-medal winning women's soccer team, was the flag bearer for the opening ceremony on Oct. 14. Toronto will host the next games in 2015. On Saturday, Mandy Bujold won gold in women's 51-kg boxing. In the canoe/kayak competiton, Richard Dalton won gold in the C1, 200m event and Ryan Cochrane and Hugues Fournel won the K2, 200m final. In women's diving, Jennifer Abel and Emilie Heymans won the silver in the women's 3m sychronized springboard final. In fencing, Canada won silver in the men's team sabre final and Canada's women's team won silver in epee final. Canada's men's field hockey team was unable to lock up an Olympic berth, dropping a 3-1 decision to Argentina in the gold-medal match, winning the silver. In men's water polo, Canada lost to the US 7-3 in the final, winning the silver medal. Entering Sunday's competition, Canadian athletes had won a total of 118 medals. (29 gold, 40 silver and 49 bronze). That was good for fifth place in the medal standings, behing the US, Brazil, Cuba and Mexico. In the 2007 Games in Rio de Janeiro, Canada won 137 medals (39 gold, 43 silver, 55 bronze), finishing behind the US and Brazil

NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE

Saturday's results: Montreal defeated Boston 4-2, Ottawa defeated the New York Rangers 5-4 in a shootout, Toronto defeated Pittsburgh 4-3, Tampa Bay shut out Winnipeg 1-0 and Vancouver defeated Washington 7-4.

CANADIAN FOOTBALL LEAGUE

Sunday's result: Calgary defeated Montreal 32-27. On Saturday, Saskatchewan defeated Hamilton 19-3 and BC defeated Edmonton 29-20.

FIGURE SKATING

Canadian Patrick Chan began the defence of his world championship with a come-from-behind win in the men's event at Skate Canada in Mississauga, ON on Saturday. Chan was third after the men's short program Friday, but his free skate program was good enough, even with a fall and a stumble. Fourteen-year-old Elizaveta Tuktamisheva of Russia won the women's title. She's the youngest gold medallist since Canada's Tracey Wainman won at age 13 in 1981.

MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL

Canadian right-hander Ryan Dempster, who was 10-14 last season, has exercised his $14 million US player option and will return to the Chicago Cubs in 2012.


Monday's forecasts


Vancouver has a mix of sun and cloud with a forecast high temperature of 11 degrees Celsius. Calgary is cloudy with a high of six, Regina is sunny, a high of eight. Winnipeg is sunny, a high of nine. Toronto is cloudy with a chance of showers, a high of nine. Ottawa has a mix of sun and cloud, a high of eight. Montreal is sunny, a high of nine. Fredericton is sunny, a high of seven. Charlottetown has a mix of sun and cloud, a high of six. Halifax is sunny, a high of five. St. John's has periods of rain or snow, a high of three. Whitehorse and Yellowknife are cloudy with a chance of flurries, highs of zero. Iqaluit is cloudy, a high of minus-seven.

Sunday, October 30, 2011

Radio Prague Today 10.30.2011

Articles posted on www.radio.cz today

Sunday Music Show 30.10.2011

In this edition of Sunday Music Show, Peter Smith plays hits from chart topping Czech artists including 4Life and Kristof. There is also a chance to hear the vocal talents of Helena Vondrackova's less famous neice, Lucie.

News 10.30.2011

------------------------------------------------------------------------
Copyright (c) 2011 Radio Prague (Cesky Rozhlas 7 - Radio Praha)

News Sunday, October 30th, 2011

By: Jan Richter

* The police are prosecuting two judges of the Litomerice district
court, in north Bohemia, on charges of corruption and abuse of power.

* The finance minister expects the Czech economy to slow down to
1-percent GDP growth next year.

* Solar Eclipse has won the award for best Czech documentary of 2011 at
the Jihlava film festival.

* The investment group PPF has posted a profit of 150 million euro over
the first six months of this year.

* Czech tennis player Petra Kvitova has won the WTA Championships in
Istanbul.

========================================================================
Two Litomerice judges prosecuted on charges of corruption, abuse of
power
------------------------------------------------------------------------

The police are prosecuting two judges and a court official of the
Litomerice district court, in north Bohemia, on charges of corruption
and abuse of power. One of the judges has been detained, the other is
being prosecuted at large, a spokeswoman for the regional prosecutor
told the CTK news agency on Sunday. Without giving further details, the
spokeswoman said the police were looking into the judges' rulings in
several criminal cases. If convicted, all three would face up to eight
years in prison.


========================================================================
Finance Minister expects 1 pct GDP growth in 2012
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Speaking on Czech TV on Sunday, Czech Finance Minister Miroslav
Kalousek said he expected the Czech economy to slow down to 1-percent
GDP growth next year, down from the ministry's previous estimate of 2.5
percent. The Finance Ministry is to release its official estimate on
Monday. Mr Kalousek said that according to the latest forecast, state
revenues in 2012 will decrease by between 17 and 18 billion crowns, and
that it "made no sense" to revise next year's state budget because of
that. The finance minister warned however that January's outlook might
be even worse.


========================================================================
Solar Eclipse wins best Czech documentary of 2011 award at Jihlava film
festival
------------------------------------------------------------------------

The film Solar Eclipse (Pod sluncem tma) by Martin Marecek won the
award for the best Czech documentary at the 15th International
Documentary Film Festival in Jihlava on Saturday night. The film, which
confronts the attitudes of Czech aid workers in Zambia with the world
of local villagers premiered at the festival where it also won the
spectators' award. It's the first Czech film shot with a photo camera.
The Belgian film Lost Land won the prize for best international
documentary while the award for best Central and Easter European
documentary went to Bakhmaro by Georgian director Salome Jashi. The
Jihlava festival, which the largest such event in the region presented
more than 200 films from over 40 countries.


========================================================================
Edward Fagan to present his demands to Karlovy Vary mayor
------------------------------------------------------------------------

The controversial US lawyer Edward Fagan, who holds bonds issued in
1924 by the town of Karlovy Vary, wants to hand his demands to the
town's mayor on Monday. Mr Fagan earlier said if the town or the Czech
Finance Ministry does not negotiate with him, he will take the issue to
court. Karlovy Vary Mayor Petr Kulhanek said he would meet with Mr
Fagan if he has time.

Edward Fagan says he is one of the holders of bonds the west Bohemian
town issued in 1924 in New York. Although part of the bonds were paid
off before and after WWII, Mr Fagan wants to cash in on them; their
total value today has been estimated at around 500 million US dollars.


========================================================================
PPF posts 150 million euro profit in first half of 2011
------------------------------------------------------------------------

The investment group PPF, owned by the richest Czech, Petr Kellner,
posted a profit of 150 million euro for the first six months of this
year, up from 83 million euro of profit over the same period last year,
a spokesman for the company said on Sunday. One of group's
shareholders, Jiri Smejc, said the profit was mainly driven by the
firm's retail and mining activities in Russia.


========================================================================
Cartoonist Jiri Winter-Neprakta dies aged 87
------------------------------------------------------------------------

The cartoonist Jiri Winter-Neprakta died in Prague on Sunday at the age
of 87, the news website novinky.cz reported. Mr Winter Neprakta
authored dozens of thousands of cartoons, mainly in collaboration with
the writer Miloslav Svandrlik. Born as Jiri Winter in Prague, he was
jailed by the Nazis for the possession of weapons. After the war, he
briefly studied biology before embarking on a full-time career of
cartoonist.


========================================================================
Fire destroys Silesian bike factory worth 15 million crowns
------------------------------------------------------------------------

A fire destroyed a bicycle factory hall in the town of Otice, in the
north-east of the country, on Saturday night, causing a damage of 15
million crowns. It took fire fighters eight hours to put out the fire,
a spokesman for the local fire brigade said. Fire fighter could not get
inside and had to pour water on the hall from outside, and managed to
save a nearby administrative building. The police are investigating the
cause of the fire. The mayor of the town said they offered assistance
to the factory's owners so that they can re-launch production as soon
as possible.


========================================================================
Tennis: Kvitova takes WTA Championships title
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Czech tennis player Petra Kvitova on Sunday won the end-of-season WTA
Championships in Istanbul after she beat Viktoria Aznarenka of Belarus
in the final 7:5, 4:6, 6:3. Kvitova swept through the tournament and
only lost two sets on her way to the final where she dramatically
defeated the Belarusian in three sets.

This season has been the best in the 21-year-old Czech player's career;
she won five out of her six WTA titles, including that of Wimbledon.
Kvitova's win at WTA event in Istanbul will also move her up to
career-high number two in world rankings.


========================================================================
Weather
------------------------------------------------------------------------

The next few days will be mostly overcast, with daytime highs of around
12 degrees Celsius.


++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Articles posted on www.radio.cz today
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Sunday Music Show 30.10.2011
------------------------------------------------------------------------

In this edition of Sunday Music Show, Peter Smith plays hits from chart
topping Czech artists including 4Life and Kristof. There is also a
chance to hear the vocal talents of Helena Vondrackova's less famous
neice, Lucie.

http://www.radio.cz/en/section/sunday-music-show/sunday-music-show-2011-10-30


------------------------------------------------------------------------
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RCI Cyberjournal

Edition 29 October 2011
Canadian International Sports Weather
Canadian

Commonwealth leaders continue to spar over human rights


Commonwealth leaders, including Canada's prime minister, Stephen Harper, talked through the day at their summit in Australia Saturday but failed to find a way to deal with urgent human rights reforms. The reforms are said to be critical to the 54-member Commonwealth's survival because of rule-of-law abuses in many Commonwealth countries. The Perth Summit had been billed as a last-chance opportunity to revive the relevance of the 80-year-old international grouping before it heads to troubled Sri Lanka for its 2013 leaders' conference. Mr. Harper has said if if the human rights issues are not dealt with in Sri Lanka, Canada will boycott that meeting. Mr. Harper, who had expected a final communiqué to be completed by Saturday night, scrubbed plans for an early departure because key details remain on the table for Sunday's closing session. A report that officially remains under wraps but has been widely leaked, asserts that possibly terminal rot has set into the Commonwealth due to its silence about abuses, including forced marriages, laws against homosexuality and political repression.



Afghanistan claims the life of another Canadian soldier


The war in Afghanistan has claimed the life of another Canadian soldier. The soldier was among the dead after a Taliban suicide bomber rammed his vehicle into an armoured NATO bus that was travelling between bases in Kabul on Saturday. A total of 13 NATO personnel were killed -- five soldiers and eight civilian employees. It was the first Canadian death in Afghanistan since the military ended its combat mission earlier this year. Some 920 Canadian military personnel are still in the country training Afghan forces. The military has informed the soldier's family but hasn't released the soldier's identity. The attack along a busy thoroughfare in the Afghan capital also killed four Afghans, and counts among the deadliest attacks on coalition troops in more than two months. A total of 158 Canadian Forces personnel have now been killed in Afghanistan since Canada joined the NATO mission in early 2002.



MacKay accesses Libyan mission


Defence Minister Peter MacKay says Canada's mission in Libya cost less than expected. The minister said that as of two weeks ago, the cost was about $50 million. The minister said initial projections last June, based in part on the cost of the first three months of the mission, were about $60 million. Mr. MacKay said the mission was successful by anyone's standards. The NATO mission of which Canada was a part ends Oct. 31, although Canada has pledged to help Libya as it rebuilds after 42 years under deposed leader Moammar Gadhafi, who was shot and killed last week.



RCMP releases report on involvement with native residential schools


The RCMP hasreleased its first complete assessment of its involvement in native residential schools. Deputy Commisioner Steve Graham presented the report o the federal Truth and Reconciliation Commission in Halifax on Saturday. It covers a period of more than 100 years. It says RCMP officers usually weren't aware of the need to investigate abuse in the native residential school system because aboriginal families were reluctant to tell them what was occurring behind closed doors. The 457-page report says the police acted on behalf of the federal government to track down children who had run away from the schools and to tell parents they had to send their children to the schools. The government-funded, church-run residential schools operated from the 1870s until the final closure of a school outside Regina in 1996. About 150,000 aboriginal children attended residential schools. A majority of those who attended the schools were sexually or physically abused during their stay. The Truth and Reconciliation Commission has a five-year mandate to document the history of residential schools, inspire reconciliation and produce a report by 2014.



Ottawa plans to crack down on marriages of convenience


The federal government is planning to get tough with people who are in marriages of convenience to gain Canadian citizenship. According to Immigration Minister Jason Kenney, the new rules will be introduced later this year and will include a conditional period to ensure marriages are real. He said the Conservative government wants to put a stop to what he described as the "revolving door of marriage fraud" in which someone will gain citizenship through marriage, get a divorce and then sponsor another individual for citizenship. He added that under the new regulations, spouses who have already sponsored a partner are expected to be prohibited from sponsoring a new spouse for five years.



US agents ease searches at Canadian border


US border agents have quietly stopped routinely searching buses, trains and airports for illegal immigrants at transportation hubs along the Canadian border. Current and former US Border Patrol agents say field offices around the country began receiving the order last month. The Obama administration had said it would allow many illegal immigrants to remain in the US and will focus on deporting those who have committed crimes. The routine bus, train and airport checks typically involved agents questioning people who appeared suspicious. Immigrant rights groups have long criticized the tactic, saying it amounted to racial profiling and violated travellers' civil liberties. US officials countered that it was an effective way to catch unlawful immigrants, including smugglers and possible terrorists.



Toronto demonstrators out to support Syrian opposition


Organizers were expecting about 1000 people to march through downtown Toronto late Saturday afternoon in support of the opposition in Syria. The protesters planned to release 3,000 ballons--one balloon for each civilian the UN has been killed in the Syrian protests. Some people were expected to cover their faces because of fears for their families in Syria.The march was part of a series of protests around the world. In SyriaSaturday, government troopscarried out raids and activists say at least three peoplewere killed. The raidscame one day after one of the most violent days since the protests began. Activists say at least 40 people were killed on Friday. Earlier Saturday in Toronto, Occupy Toronto staged a rally in the downtown core.



Job prospects dim for rest of 2011: Conference Board


Job hunting will likely remain difficult for Canadians for the rest of the year. The Conference Board of Canada says employment opportunities turned sour in September, following the global market turmoil that began in August. A board survey conducted in September found job prospects improving in only three of 26 metropolitan areas -- St. John's, NL, Saint John, NB, and the St. Catharines, ON.



Shot Canadian worker in Haiti is recovering


International Co-operation Minister Bev Oda says the government is working with consular officials to help the family of a Canadian aid worker shot in Haiti. Reports say retired lawyer Francklin Guerrier was wounded and another man killed Friday, while they were driving in the capital Port-au-Prince. Officials say Mr. Guerrier's injuries are not life-threatening.





International

Australia


Qantas Airways grounded all of its aircraft around the world Saturday due to ongoing strikes by its workers. Qantas chief executive Alan Joyce told a news conference in Sydney the Australian carrier's entire fleet of 108 aircraft will remain grounded indefinitely until unions representing pilots, mechanics and other ground staff reach an agreement with the airline over pay and conditions. Flights already in the air when the announcement was made were to continue to their destinations.



Afghanistan


A Canadian soldier was among 13 NATO troops killed in a suicide attack on a convoy in Kabul on Saturday. A suicide bomber rammed a van into an armoured personnel carrier travelling in a NATO convoy as it was passing the American University. The death is the first since Canadian combat operations in Kandahar ended earlier this year and the new training mission involving 920 soldiers began. The Taliban has claimed responsibility. Canada has now lost 158 Canadian Forces personnel since it first went to Afghanistan as part of the NATO force in early 2002.



Syria


Tankspounded an old district in the city of Homs on Saturday and three people were killed. The attack came a day after one of the deadliest days in the seven-month-old uprising against President Bashar al-Assad. Activists and residents said Syrian forces shot dead 40 civilians when they fired on demonstrators calling for international protection from Mr. Assad's crackdown. One activist group said fierce fighting broke out in Homs on Friday night between dozens of army deserters and forces loyal to Mr. Assad. The group said 17 soldiers were killed when the defectors attacked two security posts in the city. The UN estimates the regime crackdown has killed 3,000 people since March.

 



Gaza


Israeli aircraft struck at Palestinian militants on Saturday, killing five and wounding 11 others. Militants responded with a volley of rockets that injured several Israeli civilians, Exchanges of fire are common between the Palestinian-controlled Gaza strip and southern Israel, but this is the worst one in months. An Israeli military spokesman said the militants from the Islamic Jihad group in Gaza were hit as they were preparing to launch more rockets at Israel. The group said one of its field commanders was killed and vowed revenge in a text message sent to reporters.



Thailand


Authorities in Bangkok are shoring up the city's defences against rising floodwaters. Swelling coastal tides have already swamped the city's outskirts and much of the surrounding countryside. So far, most of Bangkok's defences are holding. Roads were jammed Friday as residents used a five-day holiday to leave the city. Officials have warned high tides due on Saturday, combined with the flow of run-off water from inundated central plains, could cause wider flooding. Heavy monsoon rains have been causing flooding in Thailand since July. More than 370 people have been killed and swathes of the country affected.



Australia


Commonwealth leaders meeting in Australia have failed to reach an agreement on urgent human rights reforms some say are critical to the organization's survival. Canadian Prime Minister Harper and the other leaders are looking at a report that bluntly states the future of the Commonwealth is in peril if it can't credibly address human rights, democratic and rule-of-law abuses by some of its member states. Mr. Harper scrubbed plans for an early departure from the summit because key details remain on the table for Sunday's closing session.



Taiwan


Thousands of gay rights supporters marched through Taiwan's capital on Saturday, calling for increased tolerance and the enactment of anti-discrimination legislation. The event was the ninth annual gay rights parade in Taipei, which has one of Asia's most vibrant gay communities. The parade attracted participants from around the globe. Parade organizers called for legislation to wipe out deep-rooted gay discrimination in Asian cultures.



Tibet


The exiled Buddhist leader, the Dalai Lama, has pointed to what he called China's "ruthless policy" as prompting the recent deaths of Tibetan monks who set themselves on fire in protest and he called on Beijing Saturday to change its approach to ruling over the Himalayan region. The Nobel Peace Prize laureate spoke during a trip to Japan to visit victims of this year's devastating tsunami. At least nine Tibetans in their late teens and 20s have self-immolated since March in protest of Chinese rule. Beijing accuses the Dalai Lama of encouraging the immolations. The Dalai Lama fled the Himalayan region in 1959 amid an abortive anti-Beijing uprising and is reviled by China's communist government.





Sports

Sports Roundup


Pan American Games

Canadian paddlers had a terrific day Saturday at the Pan American Games in Guadalajara, Mexico. Richard Dalton won the C1 200-metre canoe race and kayakers Ryan Cochrane and Hugues Fournel also won gold in the men's K2 200-metre. Dalton's victory earned Canada a spot in the men's C1 200-metre event at the London 2012 Olympic Games. In the canoe-kayak competition on Friday, Steven Jorens and Richard Dober won gold in the K2 1000 final, Emile Fournel won silver in the women's K1 500 final and Philippe Duchesneau won bronze in the K1 1000 final. In artistic gymnastics, Kristina Vaculik won silver in the women's balance beam final, Mikaela Gerber won silver in the women's floor final, and Hugh Smith won the bronze in the men's vault. In boxing, Mary Spencer won silver in the 75kg. In fencing, Canada won the silver in the men's foil final. In women's water polo, Canada lost to the US 27-26 in a penalty shootout and won the silver. In judo, Nicolas Tritton won bronze in the men's 73kg, Stephanie Tremblay won bronze in the women's 63kg and Joliane Melancon won bronze in the women's 57kg. In diving, Kevin Geyson and Eric Sehn won bronze in the 10m synchronized final, and in women's field hockey, Canada lost to Chile 3-0 and placed fourth.

2010 Olympics

A report by a consulting firm suggests the 2010 Vancouver Winter Olympics resulted in major economic benefits to British Columbia. The firm, PriceWaterhouseCoopers, says that from 2003 to the end of last year, the games generated at $2.3 billion in real gross domestic product to the province. The report also says the Games generated more than 45,000 jobs. The report says that almost 650,000 visitors arrived in BC during the two-week period of the Games in Feb. 2010.

National Hockey League

Friday's results: Calgary defeated St. Louis 3-1 and Colorado defeated Edmonton 3-1.

Canadian Fooball League

Friday's result: Toronto defeated Winnipeg 27-22.

Major League Baseball

St. Louis defeated Texas 6-2 Friday to win the seventh-and-deciding game of the 2011 World Series. It was the Cardinals' 11th World Series title.





Weather

Sunday's forecasts


Vancouver has periods of rain with a forecast high temperature of 11 degrees Celsius. Calgary has a mix of sun and cloud, a high of 12. Regina is sunny, a high of eight. Winnipeg is cloudy, a high of six. Toronto has a mix of sun and cloud, a high of 11. Ottawa is sunny, a high of eight. Montreal is sunny, a high of 11. Fredericton has periods of snow or rain, a high of five. Charlottetown has periods of rain, a high of six. Halifax and St. John's have rain or snow, highs of four. Whitehorse is cloudy with a chance of flurries, a high of one. Yellowknife is cloudy with a chance of showers, a high of six. Iqaluit has a mix of sun and cloud, a high of minus-seven.





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