Tuesday, September 6, 2011

RCI Cyberjournal

Edition 5 September 2011
Canadian International Financial Sports Weather
Canadian

LABOUR BRACES FOR PUBLIC- SECTOR JOB LOSSES

The head of Canada's biggest labour organization says most unions will be anxious to fight jobs losses in the rest of the year, particularly in the public sector. Ken Georgetti, the head of the Canadian Labour Congress, says the federal government's plan to balance its budget by 2014 could lead to thousands of job losses at a time of already high unemployment. He accuses the Conservative Party government of sacrificing job creation, the environment and people's livelihoods in favour of corporate tax cuts. The Parliamentary Budget Officer has said he expects 6,000 civil servants' jobs to disappear.



CHINA DENIES WILLINGNESS TO HELP GADHAFI

China is denying a Canadian newspaper report that it was willing to provide the régime of Libya's leader Moammar Gadhafi with weapons in its final days. The ministry was responding to a report in the Canadian newspaper The Globe and Mail that Beijing offered huge stockpiles of weapons to Libya and held secret talks on shipping them through Algeria and South Africa. The newspaper reported Sunday that state-controlled companies in China were ready to sell weapons and ammunition worth at least $200 million to Gaddafi in late July, despite United Nations sanctions. China says it does not violate United Nations resolutions.



LAYTON WIDOW DOESN'T ASPIRE TO PARTY LEADERSHIP

The widow of late New Democratic Party leader Jack Layton says she won't be a candidate to succeed her husband. Olivia Chow says she'll continue her duties as a Member of Parliament but that the leadership isn't for her. Several NDP personalities, including MP Thomas Mulcair and party President Brian Topp, have said they're interested in the job.



B.C. SPARED FIRES

Canada's Pacific Coast Province of British Columbia says it has saved millions of dollars this year in funds that otherwise would have been used to fight forest fires. Officials say a cold, wet spring and relatively few lightning storms have made this the slowest fire season in 10 years. The province has spent $50 million fighting wildfires this year, about half what it spent last year.



AIRPLANE SKID UNDER INVESTIGATION

Canada's Transportation Safety Board is investigating an incident in which a jetliner skidded off a runway while landing in the federal capital Ottawa. The United Express plane had 44 people on board when the accident happened Sunday afternoon in heavy rain. No one was injured. The twin-engine plane, built by Embraer of Brazil, suffered some damage, including a fuel leak. In June of last year, there was a similar accident at the same airport involving the same type of plane operated by the same airline.





International

LIBYA

Thousands of Libyan rebels have surrounded the town of Bani Walid, 140 kilometres southeast of Tripoli. Bani Walid, along with the coastal city of Sirte, and the southern desert city of Sabha, are the last strongholds of supporters of fallen dictator Moammar Gadhafi. The insurgents at Bani Walid have held off a final assault in the hope that their adversaries will lay down their arms and have extended until Saturday a surrender deadline. The rebels say they hope the Warfala tribe will let them enter Bani Walid peacefully. The tribe has about one million members, comprising one-sixth of Libya's population.



YEMEN

Yemeni officials report that government air attacks have killed at least 30 people in the southern province of Abyan, including five civilians. Islamist militants have seized several towns in the province. The source say the civilians died when warplanes bombed a building in the city of Jaar that was thought to be harbouring fighters. Half-a-dozen militants were reported killed in the same city when the planes bombed a hospital where injured fighters were being treated. The standoff between supporters and opponents of President Ali Abdullayh Saleh is now in its seventh month. The president remains in Saudi Arabia where he sought medical treatment after an assassination attempt.



EGYPT

A third session was held in Cairo in the trial of former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak. He, two of his sons and six senior officers are accused of conspiring to kill protesters and telling officers to use live ammunition on them before Mubarak's ouster last February. About 850 protesters lost their lives in demonstrations against his régime. One witness at the proceedings on Monday was Gen. Hussein Saeed Mohamed Moussa, the head of communications at the interior ministry. He says he never in 30 years heard of an incident in which an order was given to use live ammunition against protesters. However, he testified that police were in fact given live ammunition to protect the ministry and prisons against attacks. He said he believed that order came from a senior officer, Ahmed Ramzi, who is one of the defendants.



IRAN

Iran says it's prepared to give the International Atomic Energy Agency full supervision of its nuclear program for five years if United Nations sanctions are lifted. Iran is under four sets of U.N. Security Council sanctions over its refusal to suspend uranium enrichment. The Agency has for years criticized Iran for refusing to answer a number of questions about its nuclear program. The Agency is also critical of the fact that it has been denied access to certain sites, including the heavy water reactor Iran is building in the central city of Arak.



PAKISTAN

Pakistan says it has arrested a senior member of al-Qaeda with assistance from the U.S. The Pakistani army says it received "technical assistance" from U.S. intelligence in the arrest of Younis al-Mauritani in the southwestern city of Quetta. Al-Mauritani is said to have received orders from the late Osama bin Ladin to attacks targets in the U.S. such as oil pipelines, power-generated dams and oil tankers. The revelation of U.S. involvement in the arrest could signify better U.S.-Pakistan relations which had suffered after the unilateral U.S. killing of bin Laden on May 2.





Financial

BOMBARDIER SELLS MORE SUBWAY CARS TO INDIA

Montreal-based manufacturer Bombardier Inc. says it has received an order for another 76 commuter cars for the subway system in the Indian city of New Delhi. The contract is worth $120 million. It's a follow-up to an order for more than 110 vehicles announced last year. Delivery of the Movia cars will begin late next year. The Movia cars are manufactured entirely at Bombardier's factory in India's Gujarat state.



MARKETS

TSX, dollar, euro: closed for holiday. Oil: Oil: $83.60 - $2.85.





Sports

SPORTS

FOOTBALL

Avon Cobourne and Quinton Porter each scored two touchdowns and the Hamilton Tiger-Cat defence held the Montreal offence to just seven points in a 44-21 Labour Day win. With the win, Hamilton now moves into a tie for second spot in the Canadian Football League East Division with the Alouettes.





Weather

WEATHER

British Columbia on Tuesday: sun north, mix sun cloud south, high C23 Vancouver. Yukon, Northwest Territories: mix sun cloud. Nunavut: rain. Whitehorse 14, Yellowknife 16, Iqaluit 6. Prairies: sun. Edmonton, Winnipeg 27, Regina 30. Ontario: sun north, mix sun cloud south. Quebec: mix sun cloud. Toronto, Ottawa, Montreal 20. Atlantic Canada: rain. Fredericton 18, Halifax 23, Charlottetown 20, St. John's 22.





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