Friday, September 30, 2011

NEWS /www.nrcu.gov.ua/

Dear subscriber!

We offer you most recent news by this moment on air at National radio company of
Ukraine. To read these news items in full, please, refer to our site
www.nrcu.gov.ua.

Sincerely yours, administrator.
webadm@nrcu.gov.ua
-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
2011-09-29 19:03:00
Drug abusers to be counted by new method next year.
The State Monitoring Centre, based on the State Service of Ukraine for Drug
Control, will assess the drug situation in Ukraine next year on the basis of its
own research, according to Volodymyr Tymoshenko, chairman of the drug
controlservice.
http://www.nrcu.gov.ua/index.php?id=148&listid=153764

2011-09-29 18:51:00
Ministry of Finance claims no threat of technical default in Ukraine.
There is no threat of technical default in Ukraine, adviser to the Minister of
Finance Viktor Kosarchuk informed on Wednesday evening.
http://www.nrcu.gov.ua/index.php?id=148&listid=153760

2011-09-29 18:42:00
No place for racial violence, aggression in democratic society.
Babi Yar is one of the most horrible tragedies of the last century, President
Viktor Yanukovych stressed in his address to the Ukrainian nation on the 70th
anniversary of the tragedy.
http://www.nrcu.gov.ua/index.php?id=148&listid=153754

2011-09-29 17:46:00
Visa-free regime with EU possible in 2-3 years.
Ukrainian Foreign Minister Kostiantyn Hryshchenko predicts that, with the
current momentum of dialogue and constant demands, Ukraine's visa-free regime
with the European Union is possible in 2-3 years, the website of the Party of
Regionsreported.
http://www.nrcu.gov.ua/index.php?id=148&listid=153757

2011-09-29 17:45:00
President Yanukovych goes to Warsaw to meet leaders of European states,
institutions.
President Viktor Yanukovych on Thursday is leaving on a two-day working visit to
Poland to participate in the Eastern Partnership Summit. In Warsaw, the head of
state will meet leaders of the European institutions, Poland and othercountries.
http://www.nrcu.gov.ua/index.php?id=148&listid=153756

2011-09-29 17:05:00
Ukrainians withdrawing money from investment funds.
In August, investors took away UAH 11 million (1 USD - 7.97 UAH) from open-ended
investment funds. For the first two weeks of September, investors managed to
withdraw from collective investment institutions an additional of UAH
2.6million.
http://www.nrcu.gov.ua/index.php?id=148&listid=153765

2011-09-29 16:55:00
Ukraine's ILO Unemployment Rate makes 8.2%.
Ukraine's unemployment rate calculated under International Labor Organization
standards in January-June 2011 reached 8.2% with 1, 811 million of unemployed
citizens aged between 15-70, according to the figures posted on the website of
the State StatisticsService.
http://www.nrcu.gov.ua/index.php?id=148&listid=153761

2011-09-29 16:48:00
German business abandoning Ukraine because of increased corruption - Ambassador.
Due to the growth of corruption in Ukraine, German business is forced to look
for cooperation elsewhere. German Ambassador to Ukraine Hans-Jurgen Heimsoeth
said this in an interview with the Ukraina Moloda publication, according to the
website of the mediaresource.
http://www.nrcu.gov.ua/index.php?id=148&listid=153758

2011-09-29 15:49:00
Actually no changes in business climate of Ukraine over 20 years - poll.
The International Finance Corporation interviewed over 2, 000 of Ukrainian
entrepreneurs with the aim to find out the changes that took place with business
climate over 20 years of the country independence.
http://www.nrcu.gov.ua/index.php?id=148&listid=153759

2011-09-29 15:00:00
Pensions to increase by $2.5 in October.
In connection with a regular increase in the subsistence level established by
the law On State Budget of Ukraine for 2011, from October 1, 2011, the size of
pension payments increases by 20 UAH (1 USD - 7.97UAH).
http://www.nrcu.gov.ua/index.php?id=148&listid=153763


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RCI Cyberjournal

Edition 29 September 2011
Canadian International Financial Sports Weather
Canadian

FM RESIGNED TO LOWER BUCK


Canada's finance minister appears to accepting the possibility of a lower Canadian dollar during the next few months. Jim Flaherty says he would expect an effect on the dollar if investors continue to invest in the U.S. dollar. The Canadian currency dropped more than a full cent on Wednesday, closing at US96.84. Canadian. The Bank of Montreal has predicted that the Canadian dollar will decline to as low as 93 cents by the end of the year.



GOVTS. WARNED OF GRIM SPENDING CHOICES


Canada's governments have been warned that they face dramatic choices when it comes to future spending. The warning comes from Parliament's spending watchdog. Kevin Page's warns that federal and provincial spending is unsustainable over the long term. His report says governments will have to choose between raising or cutting spending or find some combination of both options. The report says the major factor in long-term budget prospects is the aging of the population, a development which he says will reduce gross domestic product.



GOVT. DEFENDS COPYRIGHT BILL


Canadian Heritage Minister James Moore says the country needs a strong copyright law to power the economy and to create jobs. Mr. Moore says the Conservative government is committing to providing companies and industries with the protections they need to grow and prosper. The government reintroduced the copyright legislation that died on the order paper in Parliament when the May 2 election was called. The government is trying to make the law compatible with the World Intellectual Property Organization treaty. The proposed legislation was applauded by the Canadian Chamber of Commerce but not by the official opposition party. MP Charlie Angus of the New Democratic Party was critical of a clause of concern to consumers, universities and filmmakers that would make it illegal to pick a "digital lock" installed on a copyrighted work. This would make it illegal to evade a digital lock in a DVD to burn it into an iPad or hard drive. Mr. Angus says the measure would be unfair to consumers.



PM DEFENDS MINISTER'S AIRPLANE USE


Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper has defended his defence minister's use of government aircraft. The question of Peter MacKay's use of the aircraft arose in the House of Commons on Thursday. The opposition has criticized him for spending $3 million to fly on Challenger VIP jets since he assumed his post in 2008. In recent weeks, Mr. MacKay has been chided for having had a search-and-rescue helicopter pick him up at a fishing lodge in Newfoundland after a vacation. Mr. Harper responded by saying the minister has mostly flown the jets to attend repatriation ceremonies in Trenton, ON, for soldiers killed in Afghanistan. The defence critic for the opposition New Democratic Party, Jack Harris, ridiculed the explanation, accusing Mr. MacKay of using government jets to attend government announcements instead of boarding commercial flights as other cabinet ministers do.



U.S. STILL WORRIES ABOUT CANADA BORDER


The United States is considering building fences along its border with Canada to increase defences against terrorists and other criminals. The U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agency is proposing to use fencing and other barriers to manage trouble spots. It's also considering increased use of radar ground sensors and drones. The agency is inviting comment on the options and plans a series of public meetings in Washington state and several U.S. border communities next month.



GROUPS IN COURT TO STOP ONTARIO NUCLEAR PLANTS


Environmental groups have turned to a court to try to stop the Ontario government from building new nuclear plants. Greenpeace and three other groups are seeking an injunction to prevent the construction of two new nuclear reactors at Darlington, 70 kilometers east of Toronto. The government says the nuclear-generated power is needed as it phases out coal-power plants and other nuclear generators. Greenpeace argues that the two new reactors would be too expensive, block the expansion of green energy, increase the risk of an acciddent and threaten the environment. The group also says the Fukushima nuclear disaster in Japan has been a global wakeup call that the Canadian authorities are refusing to hear.



CREW OF LOST SAILING SHIP POORLY TRAINED


A report about the capsizing of a tall ship based in the eastern Canadian province of Nova Scotia says the crew of the Concordia were inadequately trained. The Concordia capsized in rough seas 550 kilometres southeast of Rio de Janeiro. The 64 people on board were adrift for two days. The report by the Transportation Safety Board of Canada says the crew weren't trained in risk assessment and did not take appropriate measures for a storm such as lowering sails, sealing openings or changing course before a squall hit with winds of up to 56 k an hour. The passengers had only 20 to escape before the Concordia capsized.





International

SYRIA


Supporters of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad threw rocks and tomatoes at the convoy of the U.S. ambassador on Thursday as he visited an opposition leader. The U.S. state department says no one was hurt but several cars were damaged. The department says the Syrian government was trying to intimidate a diplomat who was witnessing the brutality of the government. The envoy, Robert Ford, has angered the government by visiting the scenes of protests against Mr. al-Assad. The government accuses the diplomat of inciting violence.



UKRAINE


Former Ukrainian Prime Minister Yulia Timoshenko has told a court in Kiev that she is a victim of a "lynching" and that her trial has shamed Ukraine. In a four-hour speech summing up her defence at the end of the trial, she attacked the leadership of President Viktor Yanukovich and said she would never ask him for a pardon. She risks a seven-year sentence if found guilty of having negotiated exorbitantly high natural gas prices with Russia when she was Prime Minister in 2009. Mrs. Timoshenko narrowly lost the presidential election to Mr. Yanukovich in 2010.



PAKISTAN


Pakistan's intelligence chief has denied a U.S. accusation that the Pakistani government supports a Pakistani militant group. Lieut.-Gen. Ahmed Shuja Pasha told the Reuters news agency that other intelligence agencies operate inside Pakistan in support of militant groups. Gen. Pasha head the Inter-Services Intelligence agency. Last Thursday, the U.S. chief of staff, Adm. Mike Mullen, accused the ISI of supporting the Haqqani network, which the Americans accuse of responsibility for an attack on the U.S. embassy in Kabul. Local news media in Islamabad report Gen. Pasha of saying that U.S. military action against insurgents in Pakistan would be unacceptable and that the country's military would be able to respond to such a provocation, a remark he later denied.



GREECE


EU and IMF auditors held talks in Athens on Thursday with Greek officials. The officials were trying to persuade the visitors that the government's budget cuts and tax increases are credible enough to release the latest payment from the first of two bailout packages. The government has said that if the new tranche of $11 billion isn't released, it will be in default in two weeks. Several hundred government employees demonstrated in central Athens to protest against cuts in pensions, salaries and personnel numbers. Meanwhile in Berlin, the German parliament voted in favour of a plant to increase the European Financial Stability Facility. The Fund would also be authorized to buy bonds of debt-stricken members of the eurozone such as Greece.



NIGER


The government of Niger says it won't turn over a son of ousted Libyan dictator Moammar Gadhafi to face justice. Niger's prime minister, Brigi Rafini, said on Thursday during a visit to France that his government won't turn over Saadi Gadhafi because there's no assurance he would receive a fair trial. The son fled to Niger after anti-Gadhafi fighters seized Tripoli last month. Earlier in the week, Interpol issued an arrest warrant for him for allegedly having commanded military units involved in anti-Gadhafi demonstrations by civilians. Meanwhile in Tripoli, three U.S. senators say they raised the issue of the Lockerbie bombing with the new authorities. Sen. John McCain said afterwards that the senators are confident that they will co-operate to find out who were the perpetrators. Two-hundred-and-fifty-nine people on a Pan Am airliner died when it exploded over the Scottish town of Lockerbie in 1988. Most of them were Americans. There was considerable indignation in the U.S. when the Scottish government released the only person convicted in the bombing on humanitarian grounds in 2009 because he supposedly was dying. Libyan Abdelbaset al-Megrahi is still alive in Libya.





Financial

U.S. GOVERNOR BACKS CANADIAN PIPELINE


The governor of the Midwestern U.S. state of South Dakota has come out in support of a controversial Canadian project to build an oil pipeline across the region. Gov. Dennis Daugaard says TransCanada Pipeline Inc.'s Keystone XL line would create jobs in South Dakota, provide more than $10 billion in yearly local property taxes and offer a way to convey the state oil to refineries. Mr. Daugaard also says he agrees with the U.S. state department assessment that the project isn't an environmental threat. The pipeline would convey crude oil from Alberta's oilsands region 2,700 kilometres across six U.S. states to refineries along the Gulf coast of Texas. Opponents of the pipeline plan consider it an environmental danger and a boost to the oilsands industry, a major producer of greenhouse gases.



HIGH COURT TO HEAR TELECOM APPEAL


The Supreme Court of Canada has agreed to hear an appeal of a case involving broadcasters on one side and cable and satellite providers on the other. The high court will rule on whether the federal telecom regulator has the power to establish a system which would allow broadcasters to charge for the use of their programs, as the broadcasters demand. The Canadian Radio-Television and Telecommunications Commission itself referred the matter to the Supreme Court after announcing its plan to set up such a régime. A lower court had previously ruled that the CRTC has the power to do so, but the cable and satellite companies appealed the decision on the grounds that the Commission was exceeding its jurisdiction.



MARKETS


TSX on Thursday: 11,686 + 100. Dollar: US.96. Euro: $1.40. Oil: $82.29 + $1.08.





Sports

SPORTS


FOOTBALL

In the Canadian Football League, the Winnipeg Blue Bombers will be minus their starting quarterback for tomorrow night's showdown with the Montreal Alouettes. Veteran Buck Pierce will miss the contest after aggravating a rib injury in last week's 25-24 road loss to Toronto. Backup Alex Brink is listed as the club's starter despite suffering a shoulder injury against Toronto.





Weather

WEATHER


British Columbia on Friday: rain, high C15 Vancouver. Yukon: mix sun cloud snow. Northwest Territories: mix sun cloud. Nunavut: rain. Whitehorse 8, Yellowknife 9, Iqaluit 3. Alberta: mix sun cloud. Saskatchewan, Manitoba: sun. Edmonton 23, Regina 22, Winnipeg 15. Ontario, Quebec: rain. Toronto 17, Ottawa 16, Montreal 18. Atlantic Canada: rain. Fredericton, Halifax, Charlottetown 21, St. John's 20.





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RCI Cyberjournal

FM RESIGNED TO LOWER BUCK


Canada's finance minister appears to accepting the possibility of a lower Canadian dollar during the next few months. Jim Flaherty says he would expect an effect on the dollar if investors continue to invest in the U.S. dollar. The Canadian currency dropped more than a full cent on Wednesday, closing at US96.84. Canadian. The Bank of Montreal has predicted that the Canadian dollar will decline to as low as 93 cents by the end of the year.

GOVTS. WARNED OF GRIM SPENDING CHOICES


Canada's governments have been warned that they face dramatic choices when it comes to future spending. The warning comes from Parliament's spending watchdog. Kevin Page's warns that federal and provincial spending is unsustainable over the long term. His report says governments will have to choose between raising or cutting spending or find some combination of both options. The report says the major factor in long-term budget prospects is the aging of the population, a development which he says will reduce gross domestic product.

GOVT. DEFENDS COPYRIGHT BILL


Canadian Heritage Minister James Moore says the country needs a strong copyright law to power the economy and to create jobs. Mr. Moore says the Conservative government is committing to providing companies and industries with the protections they need to grow and prosper. The government reintroduced the copyright legislation that died on the order paper in Parliament when the May 2 election was called. The government is trying to make the law compatible with the World Intellectual Property Organization treaty. The proposed legislation was applauded by the Canadian Chamber of Commerce but not by the official opposition party. MP Charlie Angus of the New Democratic Party was critical of a clause of concern to consumers, universities and filmmakers that would make it illegal to pick a "digital lock" installed on a copyrighted work. This would make it illegal to evade a digital lock in a DVD to burn it into an iPad or hard drive. Mr. Angus says the measure would be unfair to consumers.

PM DEFENDS MINISTER'S AIRPLANE USE


Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper has defended his defence minister's use of government aircraft. The question of Peter MacKay's use of the aircraft arose in the House of Commons on Thursday. The opposition has criticized him for spending $3 million to fly on Challenger VIP jets since he assumed his post in 2008. In recent weeks, Mr. MacKay has been chided for having had a search-and-rescue helicopter pick him up at a fishing lodge in Newfoundland after a vacation. Mr. Harper responded by saying the minister has mostly flown the jets to attend repatriation ceremonies in Trenton, ON, for soldiers killed in Afghanistan. The defence critic for the opposition New Democratic Party, Jack Harris, ridiculed the explanation, accusing Mr. MacKay of using government jets to attend government announcements instead of boarding commercial flights as other cabinet ministers do.

U.S. STILL WORRIES ABOUT CANADA BORDER


The United States is considering building fences along its border with Canada to increase defences against terrorists and other criminals. The U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agency is proposing to use fencing and other barriers to manage trouble spots. It's also considering increased use of radar ground sensors and drones. The agency is inviting comment on the options and plans a series of public meetings in Washington state and several U.S. border communities next month.

GROUPS IN COURT TO STOP ONTARIO NUCLEAR PLANTS


Environmental groups have turned to a court to try to stop the Ontario government from building new nuclear plants. Greenpeace and three other groups are seeking an injunction to prevent the construction of two new nuclear reactors at Darlington, 70 kilometers east of Toronto. The government says the nuclear-generated power is needed as it phases out coal-power plants and other nuclear generators. Greenpeace argues that the two new reactors would be too expensive, block the expansion of green energy, increase the risk of an acciddent and threaten the environment. The group also says the Fukushima nuclear disaster in Japan has been a global wakeup call that the Canadian authorities are refusing to hear.

CREW OF LOST SAILING SHIP POORLY TRAINED


A report about the capsizing of a tall ship based in the eastern Canadian province of Nova Scotia says the crew of the Concordia were inadequately trained. The Concordia capsized in rough seas 550 kilometres southeast of Rio de Janeiro. The 64 people on board were adrift for two days. The report by the Transportation Safety Board of Canada says the crew weren't trained in risk assessment and did not take appropriate measures for a storm such as lowering sails, sealing openings or changing course before a squall hit with winds of up to 56 k an hour. The passengers had only 20 to escape before the Concordia capsized.


SYRIA


Supporters of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad threw rocks and tomatoes at the convoy of the U.S. ambassador on Thursday as he visited an opposition leader. The U.S. state department says no one was hurt but several cars were damaged. The department says the Syrian government was trying to intimidate a diplomat who was witnessing the brutality of the government. The envoy, Robert Ford, has angered the government by visiting the scenes of protests against Mr. al-Assad. The government accuses the diplomat of inciting violence.

UKRAINE


Former Ukrainian Prime Minister Yulia Timoshenko has told a court in Kiev that she is a victim of a "lynching" and that her trial has shamed Ukraine. In a four-hour speech summing up her defence at the end of the trial, she attacked the leadership of President Viktor Yanukovich and said she would never ask him for a pardon. She risks a seven-year sentence if found guilty of having negotiated exorbitantly high natural gas prices with Russia when she was Prime Minister in 2009. Mrs. Timoshenko narrowly lost the presidential election to Mr. Yanukovich in 2010.

PAKISTAN


Pakistan's intelligence chief has denied a U.S. accusation that the Pakistani government supports a Pakistani militant group. Lieut.-Gen. Ahmed Shuja Pasha told the Reuters news agency that other intelligence agencies operate inside Pakistan in support of militant groups. Gen. Pasha head the Inter-Services Intelligence agency. Last Thursday, the U.S. chief of staff, Adm. Mike Mullen, accused the ISI of supporting the Haqqani network, which the Americans accuse of responsibility for an attack on the U.S. embassy in Kabul. Local news media in Islamabad report Gen. Pasha of saying that U.S. military action against insurgents in Pakistan would be unacceptable and that the country's military would be able to respond to such a provocation, a remark he later denied.

GREECE


EU and IMF auditors held talks in Athens on Thursday with Greek officials. The officials were trying to persuade the visitors that the government's budget cuts and tax increases are credible enough to release the latest payment from the first of two bailout packages. The government has said that if the new tranche of $11 billion isn't released, it will be in default in two weeks. Several hundred government employees demonstrated in central Athens to protest against cuts in pensions, salaries and personnel numbers. Meanwhile in Berlin, the German parliament voted in favour of a plant to increase the European Financial Stability Facility. The Fund would also be authorized to buy bonds of debt-stricken members of the eurozone such as Greece.

NIGER


The government of Niger says it won't turn over a son of ousted Libyan dictator Moammar Gadhafi to face justice. Niger's prime minister, Brigi Rafini, said on Thursday during a visit to France that his government won't turn over Saadi Gadhafi because there's no assurance he would receive a fair trial. The son fled to Niger after anti-Gadhafi fighters seized Tripoli last month. Earlier in the week, Interpol issued an arrest warrant for him for allegedly having commanded military units involved in anti-Gadhafi demonstrations by civilians. Meanwhile in Tripoli, three U.S. senators say they raised the issue of the Lockerbie bombing with the new authorities. Sen. John McCain said afterwards that the senators are confident that they will co-operate to find out who were the perpetrators. Two-hundred-and-fifty-nine people on a Pan Am airliner died when it exploded over the Scottish town of Lockerbie in 1988. Most of them were Americans. There was considerable indignation in the U.S. when the Scottish government released the only person convicted in the bombing on humanitarian grounds in 2009 because he supposedly was dying. Libyan Abdelbaset al-Megrahi is still alive in Libya.


U.S. GOVERNOR BACKS CANADIAN PIPELINE


The governor of the Midwestern U.S. state of South Dakota has come out in support of a controversial Canadian project to build an oil pipeline across the region. Gov. Dennis Daugaard says TransCanada Pipeline Inc.'s Keystone XL line would create jobs in South Dakota, provide more than $10 billion in yearly local property taxes and offer a way to convey the state oil to refineries. Mr. Daugaard also says he agrees with the U.S. state department assessment that the project isn't an environmental threat. The pipeline would convey crude oil from Alberta's oilsands region 2,700 kilometres across six U.S. states to refineries along the Gulf coast of Texas. Opponents of the pipeline plan consider it an environmental danger and a boost to the oilsands industry, a major producer of greenhouse gases.

HIGH COURT TO HEAR TELECOM APPEAL


The Supreme Court of Canada has agreed to hear an appeal of a case involving broadcasters on one side and cable and satellite providers on the other. The high court will rule on whether the federal telecom regulator has the power to establish a system which would allow broadcasters to charge for the use of their programs, as the broadcasters demand. The Canadian Radio-Television and Telecommunications Commission itself referred the matter to the Supreme Court after announcing its plan to set up such a régime. A lower court had previously ruled that the CRTC has the power to do so, but the cable and satellite companies appealed the decision on the grounds that the Commission was exceeding its jurisdiction.

MARKETS


TSX on Thursday: 11,686 + 100. Dollar: US.96. Euro: $1.40. Oil: $82.29 + $1.08.


SPORTS


FOOTBALL

In the Canadian Football League, the Winnipeg Blue Bombers will be minus their starting quarterback for tomorrow night's showdown with the Montreal Alouettes. Veteran Buck Pierce will miss the contest after aggravating a rib injury in last week's 25-24 road loss to Toronto. Backup Alex Brink is listed as the club's starter despite suffering a shoulder injury against Toronto.


WEATHER


British Columbia on Friday: rain, high C15 Vancouver. Yukon: mix sun cloud snow. Northwest Territories: mix sun cloud. Nunavut: rain. Whitehorse 8, Yellowknife 9, Iqaluit 3. Alberta: mix sun cloud. Saskatchewan, Manitoba: sun. Edmonton 23, Regina 22, Winnipeg 15. Ontario, Quebec: rain. Toronto 17, Ottawa 16, Montreal 18. Atlantic Canada: rain. Fredericton, Halifax, Charlottetown 21, St. John's 20.

Thursday, September 29, 2011

NEWS /www.nrcu.gov.ua/

Dear subscriber!

We offer you most recent news by this moment on air at National radio company of
Ukraine. To read these news items in full, please, refer to our site
www.nrcu.gov.ua.

Sincerely yours, administrator.
webadm@nrcu.gov.ua
-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
2011-09-28 19:33:00
Yuzhnoye Design Office to raise USD 260 m loan from Sberbank of Russia.
State enterprise Yuzhnoye Design Office (Dnipropetrovsk) will raise a USD 260
million loan from Sberbank of Russia, according to the Public Procurement
Bulletin.
http://www.nrcu.gov.ua/index.php?id=148&listid=153688

2011-09-28 18:53:00
Steel exports down in August.
In August, Ukrainian metallurgical enterprises reduced exports compared with
July by 0.6% to 1.823 million tons.
http://www.nrcu.gov.ua/index.php?id=148&listid=153695

2011-09-28 18:23:00
President tables bill on decriminalization of economic crimes in parliament.
Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovych has tabled in parliament a bill on the
decriminalization of economic crimes. The respective bill was registered in the
Verkhovna Rada on Tuesday, according to its officialwebsite.
http://www.nrcu.gov.ua/index.php?id=148&listid=153684

2011-09-28 16:59:00
Growth of online media advertising slows down.
In the first six months of the year growth in revenues from sales of online
media advertising in Ukraine has proved to be worse than in the first half of
2010.
http://www.nrcu.gov.ua/index.php?id=148&listid=153699

2011-09-28 16:27:00
Ukraine, EU should build future relations based on democracy, human rights, rule
of law.
The European Union expects to finalize negotiations on the Association Agreement
with Ukraine to create a free trade area by the end of the year, Catherine
Ashton, EU High Representative for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy addressed
MEPs on Tuesday inStrasbourg.
http://www.nrcu.gov.ua/index.php?id=148&listid=153686

2011-09-28 15:49:00
EBRD will credit private business in railway sector for first time.
European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD) supports private
operators in the railway sector of Ukraine by extending a credit to the amount
of USD 90 million to LLC Interleaseinvest, a private owner and operator of the
rolling stock, according to the press service of the bank's Kyivoffice.
http://www.nrcu.gov.ua/index.php?id=148&listid=153693

2011-09-28 15:29:00
Ukraine takes note of Palestine's bid for UN membership.
Ukraine's position on Palestine remains unchanged, Foreign Ministry spokesperson
Oleksandr Dykusarov said at a briefing on Tuesday.
http://www.nrcu.gov.ua/index.php?id=148&listid=153687

2011-09-28 14:34:00
Ukraine may electrify its railways through Trans-Siberian Railway service.
Ukraine's participation in freight traffic via the Trans-Siberian Railway will
allow to successfully fulfill plans for the electrification of railways in
Ukraine, Ukraine's Deputy Premier and Infrastructure Minister Borys Kolesnikov
has said at a meeting of a subcommittee on transport of the Committee on
Economic Cooperation of the Ukrainian-Russian InterstateCommission.
http://www.nrcu.gov.ua/index.php?id=148&listid=153689

2011-09-28 12:51:00
NBU not to abandon currency exchange transactions requiring passports.
The National Bank of Ukraine (NBU) is not planning to change the currency
exchange procedure, which envisages a photocopy of passports, Director General
of the NBU' Department of Monetary Policy Olena Shcherbakova said at a press
conference onTuesday.
http://www.nrcu.gov.ua/index.php?id=148&listid=153694

2011-09-28 12:38:00
Trade unions to open Black Book of Shame for officials.
The Federation of Trade Unions of Ukraine has established the Black Book of
Shame, which will record violations of law by prosecutors, police, government
authorities and officials, as well as employers.
http://www.nrcu.gov.ua/index.php?id=148&listid=153690


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RCI Cyberjournal

Edition 28 September 2011
Canadian International Financial Sports Weather
Canadian

LOONIE SEEN DESCENDING


The Bank of Montreal predicts that the Canadian dollar will trade as low as US93 cents by the end of the year. BMO says the global economic slowdown will depress the value of the commodity prices that had driven Canada's currency to above parity with the American dollar in recent months. The bank predicts that even if European governments are able to satisfy investors that they can cope with national debt crises, they will likely to hampered by austerity measures and restructuring for at least a few years. The Canadian dollar closed at US96 on Wednesday. It lost five cents of value last week.



COPYRIGHT BILL REINTRODUCED


The Canadian government will reintroduce copyright legislation that died on Parliament's order paper when the May 2 election was called. The legislation would allow consumers to copy legally acquired music and movies to their iPods and computers. But it would ban most attempts to circumvent digital locks that restrict access to books, movies, music video games and electronic devices. Penalties for copyright violation would be reduced to between $100 and $5,000, compared with the current maximum punishment of $20,000 for a single offense. In 2009, the U.S. government placed Canada on its "priority watch list" of nations with the worst records of copyright protection.



GOVT. PUSHES AHEAD WITH FEE INCREASE FOR PARDONS


The Canadian government is moving ahead with its plan to increase the price for the fee for prisoners to apply for pardons. Public Safety Minister Vic Toews intends to increase the fee by four times to $631. He argues that taxpayers shouldn't have to subsidize the pardon system. The consensus at public consultation hearings last spring was opposed to the scheme. Among those opposed were 14 government bodies, including federal police and the justice department. The critics said the higher fee would hurt women and natives and open the government to legal challenges based upon the Canadian Charter of Freedoms and Rights.



OTTAWA TO LEGISLATE ON NATIVE WOMEN'S RIGHTS


The Canadian government has presented legislation to define property rights for native women on reserves who divorce or whose husbands die. The bill would give such spouses the same property rights and protections as those enjoyed by other Canadian women. The legislation would apply to reserves where there isn't already a matrimonial property régime in place. Aboriginal Affairs Minister John Duncan says the bill fills a gap in the Indian Act. But Assembly of First Nations Chief Shawn Atleo is critical. He says that although it answers some native concerns, it remains a unilateral act by Ottawa. He says the Assembly will continue to lobby for the right to develop natives' own protections for women. Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper has planned a major summit with First Nations leaders this winter.



ONTARIO'S PARTIES IN DEAD HEAT


A new poll shows the two frontrunning political parties in Ontario's election next week running neck-and-neck. The survey of 40,000 voters by Forum Research gives the governing Liberal Party and the opposition Progressive Conservative Party each 35 per cent support. The Liberals of Premier Dalton McGuinty have governing Ontario since 2003. The party has steered the province through the recent recession which devastated Ontario's manufacturing, while spending heavily on education and health care. The Conservatives have promised if elected to cut spending, except for health and education. They also vow to end the Liberals' $7-billion green energy deal with Samsung of South Korea and to stop making big investments in green energy, which have driven up electricity bills.



CANADIAN LACK CYBER SAVVY


A respected Canadian economic research group is warning that Canadians do not know enough about the technology they use every day, and therefore may be exposing ourselves to online risks. The Conference Board of Canada says people who use digital technology without taking time to understand the risks involved leave themselves open to cyber crime. The Board says clicking on suspicious links or dubious email attachments can expose personal, corporate and government networks to attacks from hackers or scam artists.



CANADA WORRIED ABOUT CONTROVERSIAL TRIAL IN UKRAINE


Foreign Affairs Minister John Baird says Canada has told the government of Ukraine that it is concerned about apparent bias in the trial of a former Ukrainian prime minister. Yulia Tymoshenko is charged with abuse of office over her handling of a gas import contract in 2009. Mr. Baird said the appearance of political bias in judicial proceedings undermines the rule of law and Canada is urging Kiev to strengthen judicial independence. Ms. Tymoshenko says the trial is an attempt by longtime political foe President Viktor Yanukovych to bar her from coming elections as a convicted felon. Prosecutors are seeking a seven-year sentence in the case. The United States and the European Union have also criticized the trial as politically motivated. The EU has threatened to scuttle an energy deal with Ukraine.





International

GREECE


Inspectors from the EU and the International Monetary Fund will return to Greece on Thursday to determine whether that country's government has taken sufficient measures to justify more bailout money. The government has said it needs a new payment of $11 billion to avoid default in mid-October. The government of Prime Minister George Papandreou has pledged to deepen budget cuts and raise taxes to win a second EU-IMF bailout package. German Chancellor Angela Merkel has said that details of a second rescue package for Greece can only begin after the inspectors certify that Greece qualifies for the sixth payment next month from the first.



BAHRAIN


A military court has maintained the sentences imposed by a miliitary court in June on 21 leaders of political protests. Eight of them are Shi'ite leaders who received life sentences. The 21 were found guilty of a variety of offences, including the formation of a terrorist group to change the constitution and its monarchy, inciting sectarian hatred, the organization of unlicensed protests and collaboration with a foreign country. Bahrain's official news agency says the eight who received life sentences could appeal or be amnestied by the king. Amnesty International says the court hearing lasted only five minutes and was a farce.



LIBYA


Libya's National Transitional Council has called on NATO for more help to conquer the last two major strongholds of pro-Gadhafi forces. The Council says 11 of its fighters were killed by rocket fire at Bani Walid,170 kilometres south of Tripoli, while 10 other lost their lives in Moammar Gadhafi's hometown of Sirte, east of the capital. Among those killed at Bani Walid is a senior commander. The NTC says NATO planes have taken out rocket launchers there but that the Gadhafi fighters have been able to replace them, so that more air attacks are necessary.



CHINA


A top American financial official says the United States could penalize China's four biggest state banks if they were found doing business with an Iranian insurance firm in violation of U.S. nuclear sanctions. The U.S. Treasury Under Secretary for Terrorism and Financial Intelligence, David Cohen, was in China to discuss measures to prevent Iran from obtaining financing for its nuclear weapons program. Mr. Cohen's China trip followed a stop in Hong Kong, where he met with representatives of the four banks in question, Bank of China, China Construction Bank, Industrial and Commercial Bank of China and the Agricultural Bank of China. Mr. Cohen says he told them that if they accepted payment from Moallem, an Iranian insurer, they could be cut off from the U.S. financial system under a 2010 US law promoting tighter sanctions on Iran. Moallem has been designated as a violator of anti-nuclear proliferation rules set by the U.S and the European Union.



PHILIPPINES


The death toll from the typhoon that struck the Philippines on Tuesday has risen to 23. Tens of thousands of Filipinos battled neck-deep floodwaters on Wednesday in the worst-affected areas. Some areas on the outskirts of Manila have 1.5 metres of water. Officials say more than 73,000 residents of Bulacan province north of the capital have been affected by the floods.





Financial

U.S. STATE RALLIES BEHIND CANADIAN PIPELINE PLAN


The Midwestern U.S. state of North Dakota says it supports a controversial Canadian pipeline project that would convey oil from Canada's oilsands region 3,500 kilometres south to refineries in the Gulf state of Texas. North Dakota's energy regulators say they favour TransCanada Pipeline Inc.'s Keystone XL pipeline project. The pipeline would cross six American states but not North Dakota. Its regulators say they're in favour of the pipeline because it could be used to convey its growing oil production in the west of the state. Opponents of the pipeline plan consider it an environmental danger and a boost to the oilsands industry, a major producer of greenhouse gases.



POTASH INDUSTRY COULD EXPAND IN SK.


The world's biggest mining firm says it may open as many as five new potash mines in the western Canadian province of Saskatchewan. One of the mines planned by BHP Billiton is already under construction. The company owns about 14,500 square kilometres of land in the province. Last year, the Canadian government rejected its $40-billion hostile bid to take over Potash Corp. of Saskatchewan, the world biggest potash company, on the grounds it wasn't of net benefit to Canada. Demand for the product and other fertilizers has risen sharply in China and elsewhere as farmer seek to boost crop and food production.



MARKETS


TSX on Wednesday: 11,586 - 235. Dollar: US.96. Euro: $1.39. Oil: $80.96 - $3.49.





Sports

SPORTS


HOCKEY

Police have charged a 26-year-old man over an apparent racial incident in which a banana was thrown on the ice at a black player during a National Hockey League pre-season game. Police say Chris Moorhouse of London, ON., has been served a summons for engaging in a prohibited activity under the provincial trespassing act. If convicted, he faces a fine of up to $2,000. The incident occurred last Thursday during the Philadelphia Flyers' 4-3 exhibition win over the Detroit Red Wings. The banana was thrown from the stands as Philadelphia's Wayne Simmonds was skating towards Detroit goalie Jordan Pearce in a shootout.

CRICKET

Cricket Canada hired Australian Michael Dighton as head

coach of its national team Wednesday.

Dighton, 35, joins the Canadian team after serving as an

assistant coach with the Netherlands at the 2011 Cricket World Cup.

He also was head coach of the Cricket Australia National Emerging

Talent Rookie Squad and batting coach for Tasmania's under-23 team





Weather

WEATHER


British Columbia on Thursday: rain north, mix sun cloud south, high C16 Vancouver. Yukon: cloud. Northwest Territories: mix sun cloud. Nunavut: rain. Whitehorse 6, Yellowknife 9, Iqaluit 3. Alberta, Manitoba: mix sun cloud. Saskatckewan: sun. Edmonton 18, Regina, Winnipeg 17. Ontario, Quebec: rain. Toronto, Montreal 20, Ottawa 18. Maritimes: rain. Newfoundland and Labrador: mix sun cloud. Fredericton, St. John's 21, Halifax 18, Charlottetown 20.





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