Thursday, March 3, 2011

Radio Prague Today 3.3.2011

Articles posted on www.radio.cz today

A new report by the Council of Europe says "deeply rooted anti-Gypsyism" is one of the main obstacles to Romanies' inclusion in the Czech society.

A new report by the Council of Europe says "deeply rooted anti-Gypsyism" is one of the main obstacles to Romanies' inclusion in the Czech society.

The Czech Senate has postponed a vote on the European Stability Mechanism.

The Czech Senate has postponed a vote on the European Stability Mechanism.

A group of senators have filed a constitutional complaint against the 26-percent tax imposed on solar power producers.

A group of senators have filed a constitutional complaint against the 26-percent tax imposed on solar power producers.

Most Czechs oppose the adoption of the euro, a new poll has shown.

Most Czechs oppose the adoption of the euro, a new poll has shown.

Pope Benedict XVI has appointed Jan Vokál the new bishop of the Hradec Králové diocese.

Pope Benedict XVI has appointed Jan Vokál the new bishop of the Hradec Králové diocese.

Politicians push ahead with formula for direct presidential elections

Political parties in the Czech Republic have just agreed some of the main lines of how a future president would be elected by the people for the first time. But while the main agreement is in place a lot of the details are still missing – and that's where the devil lurks. We look at the progress towards direct presidential elections. Justice Minister Jiří Pospíšil on Wednesday outlined the main planks on how a future president could be elected.

Scandals snowball for Education Minister

Education Minister Josef Dobeš is under increasing pressure as a series of minor affairs have built up over recent weeks into opposition calls for his resignation. Reports indicate that even some members within his Public Affairs party are seeking his replacement. However, party officials and Prime Minister Petr Nečas are standing by Mr Dobeš and blaming the media for sensationalism.

Harry Pollak, the man who saved Aston Martin

When Harry Pollak left Czechoslovakia for France in the autumn of 1938, he had no idea what the future would hold for him. As a teenager, he joined the exile Czechoslovak army fought the Nazis who murdered his family, before fleeing his country again after the communist coup of 1948, and build a career in England from scratch. Mr Pollak gives an account of his extraordinary life in his recently published memoirs. In this edition of Panorama, we talk to Harry Pollak about how a boy from a south Bohemian village ended up saving the famous British car-maker Aston Martin.