Monday, February 11, 2008

OTTAWA: IMMIGRATION CHANGES DETAILED: RCI Cyberjournal

Ottawa spells out immigration changes


Canadians struggle to defend seal hunt in Europe


U.S. tells Canadians not to worry about fingerprinting

OTTAWA: IMMIGRATION CHANGES DETAILED

The federal government has offered more details about its proposed changes
to immigration law. The stated purpose of the changes is to allow faster
processing of applications of certain categories of would-be newcomers, such
as doctors or skilled workers. A senior immigration official explained on
Wednesday that prospective immigrants who are not in high-priority
categories may have to reapply year after year, with no guarantee of ever
being accepted. Applications of those in preferred categories will be
processed first and the immigration department will stop processing
applications once the quotas for the various categories are met. Immigration
Minister Diane Finley says that although some applicants will wait much
longer, the country will get the newcomers it most needs much faster. New
Democratic Party Member of Parliament Olivia Chow reacted by saying: "It's a
lottery, and arbitrary and unpredictable."


OTTAWA: GOVT. SURVIVES CONFIDENCE VOTE OVER IMMIGRATION

In related news, the Conservative Party government has survived another
confidence vote in the House of Commons. The score was 201-68, the Liberals
voting against a motion brought by the New Democratic Party and the Bloc
Québécois voting with the NDP. The latter party presented its motion on the
implementation of the budget because of the proposed changes to immigration
law. The Liberals have denounced the legislation but for the time being
don't want to bring down the minority government and provoke a national
election.


VIENNA: SEAL HUNT A TOUGH SELL TO EU

A Canadian delegation has completed its visit to five EU countries in a
effort to argue against a ban on seal products but at least one of the
visiting Canadian acknowledges that it will be difficult to avoid such a
measure. Kathy Dunderdale, Newfoundland and Labrador's minister of natural
resources, has told the Canadian Press that animal rights groups have
campaigned persuasively in Europe and that "there's a groundswell of
opposition throughout Europe to the seal hunt." Mrs. Dunderdale says the
Canadians tried to impress on their hosts how devastating a ban would be for
remote communities in Newfoundland, which has 6,000 people employed in the
industry, as well as for the country's northern populations which rely on
seal hunting. In addition to Canada, a ban on seal products would affect
other countries which have a hunt, such as the UK, Estonia, Norway, Sweden
and Finland. The European Commission is awaiting a second report on seal
hunts before making a recommendation to the European Parliament, probably
this summer.


OTTAWA: CANADIANS TOLD NOT TO WORRY ABOUT FINGERPRINTING

The chief of the U.S. homeland security department, Michael Chertoff, says
that Canadians would be wrong to worry about international sharing of
biometric information like fingerprints, a prospect that concerns privacy
advocates. Mr. Chertoff says fingerprints resemble footprints in that
neither is "particularly private...," adding that it's important that
terrorists or criminals cannot evade security measures by exploiting
differences in Canadian and American practices. Mr. Chertoff was in the
capital on Wednesday to discuss border questions with Public Safety Minister
Stockwell Day. Starting in June 2009, only a passport or some other secure
document will be accept by U.S. customs as identification.


TORONTO: PROTESTERS DEMONSTRATE NEAR CHINESE CONSULATE

About 125 protesters demonstrated near the Chinese consulate on Wednesday, a
demonstration that coincided with the arrival of the Olympic torch in San
Francisco. The demonstrators urged a boycott of the Summer Olympic Games in
Beijing in August to protest against China's treatment of Tibet and also
demanded that the torch not proceed before the opening through Tibet for
fear of provoking more bloodshed. A spokesman for the Tibetan Joint Action
Committee warned that if the torch is carried through Tibet and to Mount
Everest, "Tibetans are going to rise again," and the Chinese government will
have an excuse again to use force. A month ago, anti-government protests
broke out in Tibet in which dozens were killed or arrested.


OTTAWA: HIGH COURT JUSTICE DEPARTS

One of the nine justices of Canada's Supreme Court is taking early
retirement. Michel Bastarache served on the nation's highest court for more
than a decade. He gave no reason for stepping down. Mr. Bastarache is 61.
Supreme Court justices may serve until age 75. His successor will have to
undergo parliamentary hearings for prospective Supreme Court judges under a
procedure that Prime Minister Stephen Harper introduced in 2006.
OTTAWA: NEWCOMERS HAVE MORE TROUBLE FINDING JOBS
A study by Statistics Canada says new immigrants to the country are having a
tougher time than in previous years to find steady work. The government
agency says those who have recently arrived in Canada typically go through
an adjustment period, including periods of unemployment and working at
part-time or temporary jobs before finding a permanent job, with the
accompanying dramatic fluctuations in salary. The study shows that
fluctuations in earnings of new immigrants were more pronounced between l998
and 2000 than between l980 and l982. It was also found that younger
immigrants, who previously had an easier time finding steady work, are
starting to encounter the same difficulties as their older counterparts. By
the late 1990s, earnings instability for immigrants in their 20s was similar
to levels seen among those in their 30s and 40s. The birthplace of
immigrants, who are increasingly arriving from China, Southern Asia and
Latin America, seems to have had a stronger impact on earnings inequality
than other factors considered in the study.


OTTAWA: IMF FORECASTS YEAR OF SLUMP

The International Monetary Fund has predicted that Canada will see slow
growth this year. It forecasts growth of just over one per cent. The IMF
says that growth will stall as a result of economic weakness in Canada's
biggest trading partner, the United States, as well as in the rest of the
world.


TORONTO: ONTARIO TRIES TO SPEED UP HUMAN RIGHTS LITIGATION

Canada's most-populous province, Ontario, is improving the agency that
handles human rights cases. The Human Rights Tribunal will receive an
additional $14 million to create new facilities and a new management system.
It's hoped that as a result human rights complaints can be resolved more
quickly. It takes as long as five years for complaints to be resolved under
the existing system.


UNDATED: MORE CHILDREN SURVIVE CANCER

The Canadian Cancer Society has released a report on survival rates of
children with cancer. It says more children are surviving the disease than
in the past because of advances in treatment. For all childhood cancers
combined, 82 per cent of Canadian children who are diagnosed are living at
least five years, up 11 per cent over the last 15 years. But the Canadian
Cancer Society says that doesn't mean the battle is over for all survivors
because about two-thirds experience future health issues, called late
effects, either as a result of the cancer or the treatment.

UNITED STATES

The authorities in San Francisco sought to avoid trouble with huge crowds
which had gathered on the occasion of the procession of the Olympic torch by
cutting the 10-kilometre path by half and by rerouting it. Thousands had
gathered, including protesters against China's role in Tibet and the
country's human rights record, at the waterfront site planned for the
closing ceremony. Hundreds of pro-China supporters and pro-Tibet protesters
shouted at each other and blew whistles. In Washington, U.S. President
George W. Bush urged China to open up a dialogue with the Dalai Lama, who
will spend five days in Seattle starting on Friday.


ZAMBIA

President Levy Mwanawasa has called for an emergency meeting on Saturday of
the Southern African Development Community to discuss solutions to the
political crisis in Zimbabwe, one of the grouping's members. Mr. Mwanawasa's
information minister says he doesn't know if Zimbabwe's President Robert
Mugabe, will attend. Meanwhile, the leader of the Movement for Democratic
Change, Morgan Tsangvirai, has started a trip around the region Wednesday,
arriving in Botswana. Mr. Tsanvgirai says he won the presidential vote on
March 29 outright and accuses Mr. Mugabe of delaying the announcement of the
results to orchestrate a runoff ballot and of procrastinating to give his
supporters time to intimidate voters.


VENEZUELA

The government of President Hugo Chavez has announced the nationalization of
Ternium Sidor, the country's biggest steelmaker. Last week, the government
resumed its nationalization drive with the announced takeover of the cement
industry. Vice-president Ramon Carrizalez says Ternium's Argentine parent
firm will be compensated and can remain as a minority partner. Mr. Chavez
first threatened to take over the company last year, during the
nationalizations of oil projects and telecom firms. Ternium's huge complex
500 kilometres southwest of Caracas has been troubled by months of short
strikes in a labour dispute.


HAITI

President René Préval made a television address to urge rioters to end a
week of violent protest over high food prices, noting that violence won't
solve the problem. On Tuesday, rioters paralysed Port-au-Prince and tried to
break into the presidential palace. At least five people have been killed
since the protests started a week ago. The cost of rice in Haiti has doubled
in the past six months, and energy costs have soared because of high world
oil prices. Mr. Préval told his compatriots that the government cannot
afford to lift taxes on imported food because it needs the revenue for
road-building and other projects. The president says that the government
prefers to subsidize fertilizer and national food production.


UNITED NATIONS

Secretary General Ban Ki-moon condemned the "terrorist" attack by
Palestinian militants in which commandos burst over the border and killed
two civilians working at an oil terminal that supplies Gaza. The raid came
after and Israeli soldiers and a Palestinian gunman died in fighting. Seven
Palestinians altogether were left dead. Islamic Jihad and two smaller groups
took responsibility but the Israeli government said Hamas is ultimately
responsible.

OTTAWA: MINISTER WANTS MARKET SOLUTIONS TO CREDIT CRISIS

Federal Finance Minister Jim Flaherty says the solution to the current
turmoil in financial markets isn't government regulation but greater
transparency. The minister says that's the upshot of the 65 recommendations
put forward last week by the Financial Stability Forum, which comprises
finance and central bank officials representing the world's leading
economies. Mr. Flaherty will on Friday attend the meeting in Washington of
G7 finance ministers and central bankers. He acknowledges that there will be
pressure for a crackdown on banks and quasi-banks which precipitated a
worldwide credit crisis by engaging in risky investments backed by high-risk
mortgages. But Mr. Flaherty pointed to the Montreal Accord process for
dealing with $32 billion in frozen asset-backed commercial paper in Canada
as an ideal framework for a market solution.


OTTAWA: RADARSAT SALE A TWO-STEP PROCESS

Federal Industry Minister Jim Prentice says the sale of Radarsat to an
American arms-maker is a two-step, the first of which involves himself and
the enforcement of the Investment Canada Act. Mr. Prentice has until April
19 to approve or reject the transaction by which MacDonald, Dettwiler and
Associates of Vancouver, BC, proposes to sell its space division, including
Radarsat and the Canadarm, to Alliant Techsystems for $1.3 billion. Mr.
Prentice says the second step is approval or disapproval by Foreign Minister
Maxime Bernier under the terms of the Remote Sensing Space Systems Act. The
proposed divestment of Radarsat and the robot arm used on the U.S. space
shuttle and the International Space Station was been criticized on grounds
of national security and national sovereignty. The satellite was developed
with an investment of $445 million by the Canadian Space Agency.


MONTREAL: BCE TAKEOVER CLEARS LAST REGULATORY HURDLE

Industry Canada has offered its approval of the acquisition of BCE Inc.,
Bell Canada's parent firm, by a consortium led by Ontario Teachers' Pension
Plan for $52 billion. Teachers' has three American private-equity firms as
partners in the consortium. The department's approval is the last regulatory
requirement for the deal, approval having already come from Quebec Superior
Court and the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commissions.
BCE expects the transaction to be concluded by the end of the second
quarter.


OTTAWA: RETAIL ENJOYED GOOD YEAR

Canadian retailers had a strong year last year. Sales increased for all
major commodities. Canadians spent $413 billion on goods and services, an
increase of almost six per cent over the previous year. Almost a third of
retail purchases were related to automobiles. More than half of all
spending was on transportation, food and beverages.


OTTAWA: MODEST SUCCESS SEEN FOR AIRLINES

The Conference Board of Canada forecasts "modest profits" of $150 million
for the country's airline industry this year. The private research group
explain that despite good growth in revenue and lower maintenance costs,
record fuel prices and labour shortages will cut into earnings over the next
five years. However, the researchers predict that fuel prices and labour
costs will abate somewhat starting later in the year.


TORONTO: SATELLITE RADIO FIRM IMPROVES RESULTS

Canadian Satellite Radio Holdings Inc., the parent firm of XM Canada,
reports that although it's results are still in the red its situation is
improving. CSR says its revenue in the second quarter that ended Feb. 29 was
$9.2 million, up from $4.9 million a year earlier. The company's loss for
the quarter fell to $17.8 million, down from $27 million. XM Canada's
president and CEO, Michael Moskowitz, says he expects the company to break
even as early as the third quarter of the year.


MARKETS

TSX on Wednesday: 13,750.55 up 23. Canadian dollar: US 98.14 cents, down
0.48 of a cent. Euro: C$1.6125, up 1.96 cents. Light sweet crude:
US$110.87, up $2.37.

HOCKEY

Canada has clinched a berth in the gold-medal game at the women's world
hockey championship. The Canadians beat Finland 4-2 in a round-robin game.
Sarah Vaillancourt led Canada with a pair of goals. The Canadians play the
U.S. in their final round-robin game Thursday.


CURLING

Canada's Kevin Martin eased the frustration
of an upset loss to China by pounding the Czech Republic 6-1 in six
ends Wednesday afternoon at the men's world curling championship.
Martin's team played like it had something to prove after a 6-5
extra-end loss to China in the morning draw.

Weather

British Columbia on Thursday: rain south, cloud north, high 11 Celsius
Vancouver. Yukon, Northwest Territories, Nunavut: sun. Whitehorse 3,
Yellowknife 2, Iqaluit -11. Alberta: rain north, snow south. Saskatchewan,
Manitoba: rain. Edmonton 4, Regina 7, Winnipeg 12. Ontario, Quebec: sun.
Toronto 12, Ottawa 11, Montreal 9. Maritimes: rain. Newfoundland and
Labrador: sun. Fredericton 10, Halifax, Charlottetown, St. John's 8.

Radio Prague Today 4.9.2008

 

Articles posted on www.radio.cz today

Current Affairs: First Czech five star hotel wins EU ecological award

The first five star hotel in the Czech Republic has been awarded the prestigious EU-Eco Label award for environmental friendliness. The Hotel Chateau Mcely near Nymburk in the central Bohemian countryside may be luxuriously equipped and charge up to 44 000Kc (2,700 US dollars) a night for it's most exclusive suite, but it is certainly not lavish at the expense of the environment. Every care has been taken to ensure that while guests are pampered and indulged, they are treated in a way which is ecologically responsible as well as. This has meant that the hotel, located in a restored and reconstructed Czech chateau, is now proudly able to show the EU flower mark alongside its five stars. Jamie Brindley spoke to the owner and manger of the project, Jim Cusumano, about how the hotel has gone about setting its environmental standards so high.

Current Affairs: Poll: Majority of Czechs oppose ban on physical punishment

Last month the Minister for Human Rights and Minorities Džamila Stehlíková proposed legislation which would ban the spanking or smacking of children on the grounds that in some cases such treatment can border on child abuse. The introduction of such legislation would see the Czech Republic join other EU countries, including neighbouring Germany. But so far, a majority of ordinary Czechs have said they are against such a move.

Current Affairs: National park protection divides ministry, municipalities

What is more important: protecting nature or protecting municipal property? This question is at the heart of a dispute between the Ministry of Environment and municipalities bordering on the Šumava National Park. Environment Minister Martin Bursík this week confirmed his decision to keep the most valuable parts of the Šumava National Park untouched, declining an appeal filed by 15 local municipalities for him to allow trees to be cut down and other measures. They argue that leaving the forest untouched may cause an epidemic of bark-beetle.

Current Affairs: Czech Republic hails success of international drug-bust operation

Czech customs officials have concluded an ongoing international operation designed to bust drugs networks smuggling cocaine to Europe. They have hailed the action as a success, with 31 people arrested for serious drug-related offenses. The police now view the Czech Republic as not only a transit country, but increasingly also as a final destination for many of the world's illegal narcotics.

Czechs in History: Czech Egyptology – from humble beginnings to international renown

Czech Egyptologists have an impressive international reputation, so much so that a new exhibition opened in Cairo this week charting the work Czechs have been doing in the field over the past five decades. The opening, which has received plenty of coverage here in the Czech press, was even attended by President Václav Klaus. Away from the pyramids and back in Prague, I paid a visit to the Czech Institute of Egyptology to meet research fellow Hana Navrátilová. She told me about the history of Czech Egyptology and its main proponents:

Sunday, February 10, 2008

Prague News 4.9.2008

News Wednesday, April 9th, 2008

By: Ian Willoughby

* Czech and US negotiators have begun another round of talks on
defining the conditions under which US soldiers will be deployed at a
planned radar base in central Bohemia.

* The government has rejected the idea of paying compensation to
Czechoslovaks who lost their property in Subcarpathian Ruthenia after
the war.

* Growth of the Czech economy should slow to 4.2 percent this year,
according to a report by the IMF.

========================================================================
Czech and US negotiators launch talks on status of US soldiers at radar
base
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Czech and American negotiators have begun another round of talks on a
treaty defining conditions under which US soldiers will be deployed at
a planned US radar base in central Bohemia. Issues to be resolved
before the signing of a status of forces agreement include the legal
status of US personnel at the base, income tax payment and the
insurance of US vehicles. Czech Prime Minister Mirek Topolanek said
there was at least one issue on which the Czech Republic would not back
down. However, he said he believed a deal would be reached within the
next two weeks, allowing the status of forces agreement to be signed in
May at the same time as the already published main agreement on the
building of the radar. The Czech Parliament still has to vote on the
matter.

Russia, which has expressed strong reservations about the planned radar
base and a linked missile base in Poland, wants to hold talks with
Prague, Warsaw and Washington on allowing its experts to inspect the
sites, ITAR-TASS reported. Both the Czech Republic and Poland are
opposed to allowing Russian military personnel on their soil.

Meanwhile, the Czech Defence Ministry has refused the Communist Party
permission to hold an anti-radar demonstration at the proposed site of
the US base on the Brdy military grounds in central Bohemia. The radar
would be part of a US global missile defence shield.


========================================================================
Government rejects compensation for Subcarpathian Ruthenia expellees
------------------------------------------------------------------------

The Czech government has rejected the idea of paying compensation to
Czechoslovak citizens who lost their property in Subcarpathian Ruthenia
after the war. They were forced to leave the region when it was ceded
to the Soviet Union in 1945. Both the finance and interior ministers
opposed the compensation plan put forward by a cross-party group in the
Chamber of Deputies, where the matter will now be debated.


========================================================================
IMF: Czech growth to slow to 4.2 percent
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Growth of the Czech economy should slow to 4.2 percent this year,
according to a twice annual report released by the International
Monetary Fund. That would be a marked slowdown after 2007, when gross
domestic product increased by 6.5 percent. Czech analyst David Marek
said he regarded the IMF outlook as pessimistic, given that the Czech
economy entered 2008 in very good condition.


========================================================================
Doctor's fees for asylum seekers unethical, says ombudsman
------------------------------------------------------------------------

The ombudsman says asylum seekers should not have to pay charges when
they visit a doctor. Otakar Motejl said asylum applicants did not have
the money to pay the fees, which were introduced at the start of this
year. Mr Motejl said it was unethical for the state to ask them to pay.
The Interior Ministry failed in a bid to introduce an exemption for
asylum seekers, while the Health Ministry has called for another system
of helping refugees pay for health care. Around 2,000 people apply for
asylum in the Czech Republic every year.


========================================================================
Peruvian police arrest Czech man over cocaine
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Police in Peru have charged a 68-year-old Czech citizen with attempting
to smuggle 3.8 kilogrammes of cocaine to the Spanish city of Valencia.
The Czech, who is alleged to have hidden the drugs in his suitcase, was
arrested at Lima airport. He told Peruvian police he had been given USD
3,000 to carry the suitcase to Valencia, but said he had no idea what
was in it. A year ago a 19-year-old Czech was arrested in possession of
3.3 kilogrammes at Lima airport.


========================================================================
New Havel play set for London stage in September
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Vaclav Havel's new play Leaving is to be performed at London's Orange
Tree Theatre in September, Lidove noviny reported. The play is
currently in rehearsal in Prague ahead of its world, Czech-language
premiere on May 22. The London premiere will mark the beginning of a
season of plays by Mr Havel which will run until December. Vaclav Havel
was a noted playwright and dissident before becoming president of
Czechoslovakia after the Velvet Revolution. Leaving is his first new
play in two decades.


========================================================================
Weather
------------------------------------------------------------------------

It should remain warm over the next few days, with temperatures of up
to 18 degrees Celsius. We can expect sunny spells and rain in places.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Articles posted on www.radio.cz today
------------------------------------------------------------------------


Current Affairs
First Czech five star hotel wins EU ecological award
------------------------------------------------------------------------

The first five star hotel in the Czech Republic has been awarded the
prestigious EU-Eco Label award for environmental friendliness. The
Hotel Chateau Mcely near Nymburk in the central Bohemian countryside
may be luxuriously equipped and charge up to 44 000Kc (2,700 US
dollars) a night for it's most exclusive suite, but it is certainly not
lavish at the expense of the environment. Every care has been taken to
ensure that while guests are pampered and indulged, they are treated in
a way which is ecologically responsible as well as. This has meant that
the hotel, located in a restored and reconstructed Czech chateau, is
now proudly able to show the EU flower mark alongside its five stars.
Jamie Brindley spoke to the owner and manger of the project, Jim
Cusumano, about how the hotel has gone about setting its environmental
standards so high.

http://www.radio.cz/en/article/102825

Current Affairs
Poll: Majority of Czechs oppose ban on physical punishment
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Last month the Minister for Human Rights and Minorities Dzamila
Stehlikova proposed legislation which would ban the spanking or
smacking of children on the grounds that in some cases such treatment
can border on child abuse. The introduction of such legislation would
see the Czech Republic join other EU countries, including neighbouring
Germany. But so far, a majority of ordinary Czechs have said they are
against such a move.

http://www.radio.cz/en/article/102824

Current Affairs
National park protection divides ministry, municipalities
------------------------------------------------------------------------

What is more important: protecting nature or protecting municipal
property? This question is at the heart of a dispute between the
Ministry of Environment and municipalities bordering on the Sumava
National Park. Environment Minister Martin Bursik this week confirmed
his decision to keep the most valuable parts of the Sumava National
Park untouched, declining an appeal filed by 15 local municipalities
for him to allow trees to be cut down and other measures. They argue
that leaving the forest untouched may cause an epidemic of bark-beetle.

http://www.radio.cz/en/article/102823

Current Affairs
Czech Republic hails success of international drug-bust operation
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Czech customs officials have concluded an ongoing international
operation designed to bust drugs networks smuggling cocaine to Europe.
They have hailed the action as a success, with 31 people arrested for
serious drug-related offenses. The police now view the Czech Republic
as not only a transit country, but increasingly also as a final
destination for many of the world's illegal narcotics.

http://www.radio.cz/en/article/102822

Czechs in History
Czech Egyptology - from humble beginnings to international renown
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Czech Egyptologists have an impressive international reputation, so
much so that a new exhibition opened in Cairo this week charting the
work Czechs have been doing in the field over the past five decades.
The opening, which has received plenty of coverage here in the Czech
press, was even attended by President Vaclav Klaus. Away from the
pyramids and back in Prague, I paid a visit to the Czech Institute of
Egyptology to meet research fellow Hana Navratilova. She told me about
the history of Czech Egyptology and its main proponents:

http://www.radio.cz/en/article/102813

Ucrain NEWS /www.nrcu.gov.ua/

2008-04-09 17:54:00
Ukrainian President Viktor Yushchenko meets with Egyptian President
Hosni
Mubarak.
An official meeting between Ukrainian President Viktor Yushchenko and
Egyptian
President Hosni Mubarak took place in frames of the official visit of
the
Ukrainian President to Egypt.
http://www.nrcu.gov.ua/index.php?id=148&listid=64154

2008-04-09 17:43:00
Terms for UkrTeleCom selling endorsed by Cabinet.
As was disclosed by State Property Fund (SPF) Deputy Chairman Dmytro
Parfenenko,
the Government supported the SPF proposal on the size of the block of
shares
with a reserve price of UAH 12 billion (UAH 2.4billion).
http://www.nrcu.gov.ua/index.php?id=148&listid=64153

2008-04-09 17:38:00
Govt approves concept of State target program for protection of
consumers'
rights for 2008-2011.
This was disclosed by prime Minister Yulia TymoshenkoIn particular, she
said
that starting from the next week the Cabinet is to hold weekly public and
open
deliberations to find solutions as to ensuring goods of high qulity
for
Ukrainian consumers.
http://www.nrcu.gov.ua/index.php?id=148&listid=64148

2008-04-09 17:03:00
Ivan Nesin says Kyiv city state administration, dispite lack of
legislative
base, manages to do impossible to solve problems of "Elita-Tsentr"
investors.
According to head of the "Association of brutally cheated citizens",
"measures
taken by the Kyiv state administration will make it possible to give no
less
than 50 thousand sq m of dwelling.
http://www.nrcu.gov.ua/index.php?id=148&listid=64145

2008-04-08 18:11:00
Foreign Minister Volodymyr Ohryzko to pay visit to Russia on April 15.
Foreign Ministry's spokesman Vasyl Kyrylych told this a news briefing today.
http://www.nrcu.gov.ua/index.php?id=148&listid=64088

2008-04-08 18:08:00
BYUT MP Mykola Tomenko stated in Parliament that his bloc will do its
best to
renew land auctions.
He expressed a conviction that the President's decision to suspend
operation of
the Cabinet's Resolution on holding land auctions will be abolished.
http://www.nrcu.gov.ua/index.php?id=148&listid=64087

2008-04-08 18:01:00
Our Ukraine - People's Self-Defense bloc faction leader Vyacheslav
Kyrylenko
made address to Speaker Arseniy Yatseniuk today.
At the Verkhovna Rada meeting today Mr Kyrylenko asked Mr Yatseniuk to learn
via
the Foreign Ministry channels if Russian President Vladimir Putin really
made
offensive statements against Ukraine during his meeting with US President
George
Bush inSochi.
http://www.nrcu.gov.ua/index.php?id=148&listid=64086

2008-04-08 17:54:00
French yacht still at anchor near Somalia's southern coast (Garacad).
The first contact with the pirates showed that the crewmembers are safe
and
sound and treated properly.
http://www.nrcu.gov.ua/index.php?id=148&listid=64084

2008-04-08 17:51:00
Prosecutor General's Office satisfied with decision by Constitutional
Court
regarding term of office of prosecutor general.
"The decision will facilitate effective work of the Prosecutor General's
Office,
" the PGO press service said.
http://www.nrcu.gov.ua/index.php?id=148&listid=64083

2008-04-08 17:46:00
Meeting of Council of Foreign Ministers of member-countries of Black
Sea
Economic Cooperation organization to take place in Kyiv on April 17.
The participants will sum up the results of Ukraine's presidency of
the
organization, Foreign Ministry's press secretary Vasyl Kyrylych told a
news
briefing today.
http://www.nrcu.gov.ua/index.php?id=148&listid=64082